Armed Robbers Can’t Handle Armed Resistance

Armed robbers aren’t looking to have gunfights; they use intimidation and threats to gain compliance. Nevertheless, they can still be very violent, and we see again and again that effective armed resistance makes them run like stabbed rats.

 

 

If you value what we do at ASP, would you consider becoming an ASP Patron Member to support the work it takes to make the narrated videos like these armed robbers being driven off? https://get-asp.com/patron gives the details.

 

Local news story on these armed robbers meeting armed resistance: https://get-asp.com/k6td

 

More local news on the armed resistance, with some more details: https://get-asp.com/n4js

 

What does this video teach us about protecting ourselves from armed robbers?

 

  1. You must accept that danger exists and that it can happen to you. This is the foundational core of spiritual fitness and the first step in taking proactive steps to protect yourself and your loved ones. If you live in a fantasyland that nothing bad can happen because nothing bad has happened in the past, you’re setting yourself up for a terrible letdown. The customer in the store who was the owner’s friend had accepted his responsibility for his own safety and was appropriately prepared for armed robbers. That was the difference here.

 

  1. Situational awareness is your best friend. It doesn’t mean that you always are paranoid or living in “condition orange,” but it does mean that you know Col. Cooper’s color code of awareness and you live by it. Pay attention to your surroundings, and recognize that when you’re in public places you need to be more aware of your surroundings than when you’re in private. This woman was okay at that and stopped with distance to spare, which gave her a chance!

 

  1. We must never settle for being able to protect ourselves against a lone attacker because of how common multiple attacker engagements are. Rats travel in packs, so we must always be prepared to face multiple attackers!

 

  1. In most instances that we see on surveillance video, the first person to put shots on target wins the gunfight. That’s not 100% because injured people can stay in the fight a long time, but it is a good “rule of thumb” because once someone gets shot they usually stop thinking about whatever it is they were doing and start thinking about the pain they’re in and how not to get shot again (we call that the FIBS Factor: “F&^%, I’ve Been Shot!”). The lesson in that is clear: be the first to put shots on target. (this is the corollary to Joe Frick’s Rules for a Gunfight #3, “Only hits count. The only thing worse than a miss is a slow miss.”)

 

  1. Keep your firearm ready to fire. Some people carry their firearm with an empty chamber, but doing so is not recommended for several reasons. First, it assumes that you will have both hands available to you to draw your firearm, which isn’t necessarily the case. You might have a hand engaged or injured. Secondly, it assumes that you’ll have time to chamber a round in a gunfight, but gunfights are won and lost on tenths of seconds. Third, it assumes that you’ll have the dexterity to chamber a round under duress, though in the moment many times I have seen people fumble their chambering attempt. Fourth, the sound of a round chambering can alert an attacker who is not focused on you that you are a danger to him, which can negate your element of surprise in a counter-ambush. Keep your defensive firearm ready to fire, with a round in the chamber!

 

There are 3 additional lessons for Patron Members and 3 class starters for Instructors from this video, so please join us in those programs to see them!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

 

 

 

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