Attacker Shot Trying to Take Guard’s Gun

Honestly, do you have the ground skills to win a fight like this? Practicing Active Self Protection means being ready to protect your firearm, and this video which shows an attacker shot for his efforts highlights that well.

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

News story on the attacker shot in the video, plus the original video: https://get-asp.com/1wzo

 

What does the attacker shot by this guard teach self-defenders?

 

  1. As one of my martial arts mentors, Skip Hancock, is fond of saying, the ground must be your friend and not your enemy. You must know how to fight on the ground and not panic if the fight goes to the ground! The attacker shot in this video was trying to kill the guard, and it was his ground skills that saved his life. You must have skills from bottom position, from top position, and in the scramble. You must be able to regain your feet and fight from wherever you find yourself. Too many fights require this skill to ignore it!

 

  1. The concept of a reactionary gap is important to consider as self-defenders. This is normally taught as something like the “21-foot rule,” though that’s a principle and not a rule. As a self-defender if you’re in a situation where an attack is a possibility, leaving yourself some distance to allow for additional time to respond to an attack from ambush is very smart. Even 2 or 3 feet of additional space allows the reactionary gap to successfully defend the ambush and get into the fight. Sure, the attacker shot in this video was a long way away at the start, but he closed the distance fast. Distance is your friend if you have a firearm!

 

  1. The Five Ds are a tool that we use at ASP to organize our training and preparation for defending ourselves against an armed attacker when we are not armed ourselves. (or, like the case of this attacker shot by the guard, to keep from having our firearm taken from us!) Deflect, Dominate, Distract, Disarm, Disable. We pursue them from first to last, in order, to give us the best chance of successfully defending ourselves against an armed opponent. Deflect their force multiplier, Dominate as much as possible (best is the whole person, second is the arm with the tool, last is the tool itself), Distract the attacker (usually using pain, redirection, movement, etc.), Disarm the attacker, and Disable the attacker.

 

  1. Our goal as self-defenders is to stop the threat. We are not vigilantes and we are not out to kill, we seek to stop the threat against us. Shooting to wound will not stop the threat reliably, and neither will shooting an attacker in an extremity. The only reliably means to stop an aggressor who means us death or grievous bodily harm is to put shots in the center of their available mass to cause nervous system collapse or bleeding out. (exsanguination is the technical term) In this video, the attacker shot by the guard ran, so the guard stopped shooting. Good work in the moment to protect himself.

 

  1. In a real gunfight, the chance of needing to shoot from an unconventional position is fairly high. Some gunfights happen at greater than two arms-length distance, where stance and press out matter. But many more happen at “bad breath” distances and from compromised shooting posture, whether a poor body position, or having the firearm in a grip or position that is less than ideal. Learning how to put shots on target from awkward and unconventional shooting positions is a very useful skill for the real world, indeed. The attacker shot by the guard did not allow him to get his gun in the fight cleanly, so the guard had to fight for his gun and then shoot off his back with one hand on the gun. That’s an odd position!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

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