Good Samaritan Fatally Wounded Trying to Stop Active Shooter

If you were in this Good Samaritan’s shoes, would you have stepped in and tried to stop the murderer? At Active Self Protection we believe that these decisions are very individual and depend on a lot of factors, but you better know beforehand what the dangers are.

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original video of the Good Samaritan being murdered: https://get-asp.com/qflu (WARNING: this site is very, very NSFW and filled with adult content…strongest warning possible…I get videos from it when I can’t find it anywhere else but do NOT endorse anything about it)

 

News story detailing the incident, including identifying the murderer and Good Samaritan: https://get-asp.com/sfvw

 

The latest information in the news, which is not very new: https://get-asp.com/3d0i

 

What do CCW holders learn from the murder of this Good Samaritan?

 

  1. Every person gets to decide who they are willing to protect. For some, their “flock” is only themselves and their immediate family. That’s an acceptable answer. For others, they are willing to protect their friends, coworkers, and extended family. For a few, it might mean being willing to protect anyone who is weak, powerless, and in need. Each of us must decide the size of our flock and have that decision firmly in mind when it is time to act. This Good Samaritan, a comedian by trade, chose to extend his flock far from himself. It was a noble gesture, for sure, and one he should be commended for.

 

  1. In a deadly force encounter, decisions of life and death will be made in the blink of an eye. On the range and in class we have time to consider and to think and to reset and to make multiple attempts, but when the balloon goes up in real life you’ve got fractions of seconds to decide what the best course of action is to protect yourself. The way to be better at decision making in the heat of the moment is training, specifically scenario training and force-on-force training that is designed to work on decision-making skills under stress. It’s offered all over the country, so get training! This Good Samaritan didn’t have time to consider his options; he had to act in the moment.

 

  1. As each of us considers whether to be a Good Samaritan and step into encounters that do not directly involve us, we must consider the implications on our lives and families. Does your desire to step in override your duty to your spouse and children and loved ones? Or is it part of your care for your family to protect others wherever you can? We must also all realize that when we come across an incident in progress that it can be VERY difficult to determine who is the aggressor and who is the defender, who are the good guys and who are the bad guys, and that must give us pause as well.

 

  1. The Bystander Effect is real. There were lots of people around here, but no one stepped in. You cannot count on anyone breaking the Bystander Effect to help you, especially if the attacker is armed and any help would be at a force deficit from it. Usually the best way to break the Bystander Effect is to have a force multiplication advantage, which is a great reason to keep your force multiplier on you at all times. Once the Good Samaritan had the situation well in hand, others came to his aid and that’s tremendous. Many times you’ll have to be the first one to break the Bystander Effect.

 

  1. Spiritual fitness is an important part of Active Self Protection. You don’t often get any advance notice of the last day of your life, but we see over and over that self-defense isn’t a guarantee of winning every fight you might be placed in. You want to be at peace with God, because you’ll need that peace on the day that you meet Him. Since you can’t guarantee advanced notice, make peace today. Certainly, the comedian who became a hero Good Samaritan didn’t wake up that morning thinking it was his last day. Let’s all live today since it’s possibly our last.

 

  1. The Five Ds are a tool that we use at ASP to organize our training and preparation for defending ourselves against an armed attacker when we are not armed ourselves. (or if we are armed but outdrawn such that we must deal with the problem with our hands) Deflect, Dominate, Distract, Disarm, Disable. We pursue them from first to last, in order, to give us the best chance of successfully defending ourselves against an armed opponent. Deflect their force multiplier, Dominate as much as possible (best is the whole person, second is the arm with the tool, last is the tool itself), Distract the attacker (usually using pain, redirection, movement, etc.), Disarm the attacker, and Disable the attacker. Neither the bouncer nor the Good Samaritan was able to dominate the gun in the murderer’s hand, and that was fatal.

 

  1. As one of my martial arts mentors, Skip Hancock, is fond of saying, the ground must be your friend and not your enemy. You must know how to fight on the ground and not panic if the fight goes to the ground! You must have skills from bottom position, from top position, and in the scramble. You must be able to regain your feet and fight from wherever you find yourself. Too many fights require this skill to ignore it! Clearly the Good Samaritan was badly injured by the time the fight went to the ground, but he did well from there.

 

  1. First aid skills are important. If you’re going to train and prepare to take a life to defend yourself, you should also have skills, training, and equipment to save life should you need to. (I carry an individual first aid kit at a minimum) Often that will not involve defensive encounters, and in a defensive encounter your primary responsibility is to yourself and your loved ones. There’s no way to tell if this Good Samaritan’s life could have been saved, but it is certainly worth having the skills for the possibility.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)

 

 

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