Gunfight Erupts When Armed Robbery Victim Fights Back

Would you have taken your opportunity to fight this gunman during this armed robbery? There are a BUNCH of Active Self Protection lessons in this one to consider!

Original video from the Broward Sheriff’s Office: http://get-asp.com/bx1v

News story with plenty of details on the incident: http://get-asp.com/rlv2

How do I protect myself in an armed robbery?

1. In any territorial or predatorial violence, the attacker gets to set the time and circumstances of the attack. They will almost always armed robbery from ambush, or as we like to call it in Kenpo, from “obscurity.” Surviving that ambush is one of the most important keys to successfully defending yourself.

2. Even in a gunfight, empty-handed skills are important because many gunfights close to “extreme close quarters” or “bad breath distances.” Knowing how to disarm a gun-wielding attacker in an armed robbery, and how to win the fight that you’re actually in rather than the fight you want to be in, is crucial.

3. To defend against this kind of attack, you need emotional fitness. Emotional fitness is defined as the ability to internally represent a situation or predicament to yourself in such a way as to make you strong and able to successfully defend yourself against it. Repeated practice and thousands of reps of sparring and self-defense absolutely build your emotional fitness to be able to handle whatever comes your way.

4. The human body is designed to take a ridiculous amount of punishment and still function. You can shoot someone multiple times and they can still pose a deadly threat! Even mortally wounded people can continue to pose a threat for several seconds to even minutes after being shot, so don’t think for a moment that shooting someone will necessarily immediately incapacitate them. That is Hollywood myth. The victim shot the attacker FIVE TIMES in the chest, and he lived. Multiple shots on target may well be necessary to stop your attacker, so shoot until the threat stops.

5. The Five Ds are a tool that we use at ASP to organize our training and preparation for defending ourselves against an armed attacker when we are not armed ourselves. (or if we are armed but outdrawn such that we must deal with the problem with our hands) Deflect, Dominate, Distract, Disarm, Disable. We pursue them from first to last, in order, to give us the best chance of successfully defending ourselves against an armed opponent. Deflect their force multiplier, Dominate as much as possible (best is the whole person, second is the arm with the tool, last is the tool itself), Distract the attacker (usually using pain, redirection, movement, etc.), Disarm the attacker, and Disable the attacker.

6. First aid skills are important. If you’re going to train and prepare to take a life to defend yourself, you should also have skills, training, and equipment to save life should you need to. Often that will not involve defensive encounters, and in a defensive encounter your primary responsibility is to yourself and your loved ones.

7. Capacity matters. My rule of thumb is that I want a minimum of 5 rounds for each bad guy I might face, which accounts for 2 misses and 3 shots on target for each. (of course, you never want to miss…I am just accommodating me on my worst day) This bad guy’s gun, turned on him fired at least 5 hits and one miss (at the second attacker) before running empty. How much capacity is enough for you? That’s a personal decision, but for me and mine I like a gun with 15 or more if I can have it.

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)

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