Hotel Clerk Thinks Fast to Protect Himself from Robbery

This clerk stayed cool and thought fast to protect himself! How would you have handled this robbery?

 

If you value what we do at ASP, would you consider becoming an ASP Patron Member to support the work it takes to make the narrated videos like this robbery stopped by a prepared clerk? https://get-asp.com/patron gives the details and benefits.

 

Find a good instructor in your area and get some training: https://get-asp.com/directory

 

 

News stories on this robbery, the clerk, and the suspect: https://get-asp.com/7pzb and https://get-asp.com/8r02 for his arrest

 

What does this video teach us about defending ourselves against a robbery?

 

  1. Evil exists in our world, and no amount of wishing it away does so. Evil people do evil things, and good people must be ready and willing to stand between them and innocent people and do enough violence to stop them definitively. No amount of negotiation will make truly evil people change their ways; only those willing and able to stop them who use attitude, skills, and plan effectively can. The hotel clerk here stopped the robbery simply by getting out of range of the tool, and that was a wise and simple solution! It might not have been the gunfight that some folks wanted to see, but it worked and that is what matters.

 

  1. In a deadly force encounter, decisions of life and death will be made in the blink of an eye. On the range and in class we have time to consider and to think and to reset and to make multiple attempts, but when the balloon goes up in real life you’ve got fractions of seconds to decide what the best course of action is to protect yourself. The way to be better at decision making in the heat of the moment is training, specifically scenario training and force-on-force training that is designed to work on decision-making skills under stress. It’s offered all over the country, so get training!

 

  1. An under-utilized aspect of understanding dimensional stages of action is using hard barriers to stay out of contact of the potential harm that an attacker wants to do to us. That could mean keeping the counter between us and a knife-wielding armed robber, or keeping a car between us and a mugger in a parking lot. Closing a door to a safe room in our home would be similar. Don’t underestimate the value in simply keeping a hard barrier between you and the threat so that the threat is out of contact, which gives you time to consider other defensive strategies!

 

  1. In MANY armed robberies, a counter is between the armed robber and the intended victims. That counter is a double-edged sword, because it can keep a knife-wielding attacker out of contact, but keeps a firearm-wielding attacker safe from your contact unless they put it over the counter. Even then, your empty-handed skills will be sorely tested by a situation when you can’t close the distance because of the counter top. The answer if you work in one of those environments is to train over the counter so that you know what your options and possibilities are.

 

  1. Remember, at the end of a defensive encounter your goal is to get to safety and end the threat against you and your loved ones. Pursuing a fleeing bad guy for whatever reason is unwise because they very well may counter-ambush you or hurt you to make their escape. Once the threat ends, let the threat go and take action to make yourself safer.

 

There are 3 additional lessons for Patron Members and 3 class starters for Instructors from this video, so please join us in those programs to see them!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

 

 

 

Copyright Disclaimer. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

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