Officer Involved Shooting Shows the Importance of Empty-Handed Skills

How many times was this officer stabbed before he got his gun into the fight? This officer involved shooting shows exactly why we harp on empty-handed skills at Active Self Protection. It also shows how fast a fight develops and how hard it can be to get your gun in the fight!

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

News story from the officer involved shooting along with the original video: https://get-asp.com/e3tl (the interview with the officer is good stuff)

 

What does this officer involved shooting teach LEO and CCW alike?

 

  1. Everyone likes to say, “Don’t bring a knife to a gunfight.” But it’s equally true that you can’t bring a GUN to a knife fight! This officer involved shooting shows that you have to win the knife fight before your firearm can come into play effectively. Trying to draw a firearm when someone is stabbing you with a knife is a great way to die, so work on your empty-handed skills to win the fight you’re in so that you can earn the right to draw your firearm and end the fight.

 

  1. Whether you’re LEO or CCW, you need to know what force options you have available and when to abandon one and move to another. (“force options” are a better model than the older “force continuum” model) You need to know when your pepper spray is the best option, or when to abandon it (or the TASER) in favor of your firearm in a split second decision. The best way, of course, to learn and embed these options in your mind is to train in force on force scenarios with the options and then respond to the situations appropriately. This officer involved shooting went from verbal to TASER to empty-handed skills to knife to firearm. That’s a lot of options!

 

  1. You must understand that your intermediate force options, those in between hands and firearm/knife (like pepper spray, TASER, baton, etc.) will not always be effective. They are designed to be used BEFORE a threat becomes a deadly threat, and we must always be ready for them to fail us. At that point, we must quickly decide whether the right answer is to move to empty-handed skills or to deadly force options. In this officer involved shooting the TASER was ineffective, and that happens quite a bit.

 

  1. You must be able to fight and defend yourself from all different stages of action. One of my martial arts mentors, Skip Hancock, likes to say that we must be able to fight wherever the fight happens to be! So whether we are at contact stage (just able to come in physical contact with our attacker), penetration stage (where attacks can contact and penetrate significantly), or manipulation stage (a clinch or similar where joint and body manipulations are possible), we must be able to use effective technique to protect ourselves. This officer involved shooting went from out of contact to penetration to manipulation stage in a hurry.

 

  1. In a real gunfight, the chance of needing to shoot from an unconventional position is fairly high. Some gunfights happen at greater than two arms-length distance, where stance and press out matter. But many more happen at “bad breath” distances and from compromised shooting posture (including this officer involved shooting), whether a poor body position, or having the firearm in a grip or position that is less than ideal. Learning how to put shots on target from awkward and unconventional shooting positions is a very useful skill for the real world, indeed.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

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