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Car Thieves Run for Their Lives

These car thieves run for their lives when they realize the jig is up! If you’ve ever dealt with a car thief (as I have), you know it can be scary but if your attitude, skills, and plan are thought through in advance you can thwart their intent and not put yourself at risk like this homeowner did.

 

If you value what we do at ASP, would you consider becoming an ASP Patron Member to support the work it takes to make the narrated videos like this clerk who takes the fight to these robbers? https://get-asp.com/patron or https://get-asp.com/patron-annual gives the details and benefits.

 

Find a good instructor in your area and get some training: https://get-asp.com/directory

 

 

The only information I have on this one is from the original video: https://get-asp.com/q3og and then, if you look up the original channel owner, he lives in Atlanta. https://plus.google.com/u/1/107767944899186231375 So if this is his coworker and his coworker is local, this is from somewhere near Atlanta.

 

What does this video teach us about defending ourselves against car thieves?

 

  1. We must never settle for being able to protect ourselves against a lone attacker because of how common multiple attacker engagements are. Rats travel in packs, so we must always be prepared to face multiple attackers!

 

  1. It’s dark for half the day, and bad guys of all kinds love to launch ambushes from the dark. That means, as a self-defender, that part of having good situational awareness involves keeping a flashlight on your person. That flashlight doesn’t have to be crazy tacticool and shouldn’t be firearm-mounted, because its purpose is to help you see at night to give you better awareness of any potential threats far before they can hurt you. A VERY compact option that runs on AAs is this Streamlight: http://amzn.to/1U9S39H and I carry this 1000 lumen Fenix: http://amzn.to/1S73jjb which is rechargeable and has multiple modes of brightness. A middle ground that I have used very effectively is this Olight: http://amzn.to/29htS3q. I highly recommend a flashlight for everyone, simply as an awareness tool at night. Keep that flashlight near your home defense gun so that you can positively identify threats!

 

  1. In almost all instances and jurisdictions you cannot use deadly physical force to defend property. (Texas is the rare exception to this, but recognize that TPC 9.42 has some significant limitations) Even in cases where you COULD use deadly physical force to defend property, it’s worth considering whether it is WISE to use deadly physical force because of the risk to yourself and to any bystanders that could come because you choose to continue to engage the criminal(s). That doesn’t usually apply to occupied buildings and cars because of the inherent value of the people inside of them, and the defense of property does vary considerably from state to state as to what’s acceptable. Please consult with a licensed attorney in your jurisdiction to be sure that you understand the laws of your area!

 

  1. The “fleeing felon rule” generally applies to Law Enforcement Officers in the performance of their duties, and since 1985’s Tennessee vs. Garner decision the ability to use deadly force to apprehend a fleeing felon by LEO has been limited to cases where the officer has probable cause to believe that the fleeing felon is a continuing threat of serious physical harm to the officer or the public. However, how that law applies to non-LEO varies state by state. Make sure to know your local laws so that you know the limitations of shooting a fleeing felon, especially if you’re not a police officer.

 

  1. Warning shots are a terrible idea with a firearm. In most jurisdictions they are illegal because they amount to an unnecessary discharge of a deadly weapon, which is reckless and negligent. (they’re legal in some cases in Florida, and I think that’s it, but as always I am not a lawyer so check your local laws) If it is serious enough to fire the firearm, that shot better go into whatever threat is deadly enough to warrant it! A warning shot, even if legal, is a bad idea because it endangers others from the projectile, ricochet, and spall; it lowers your available ammunition to actually stop the threat; it takes your firearm away from being on an ostensibly deadly threat; it violates the rules of firearms safety never to put your finger on the trigger unless you’re on the target and intend to fire.

 

There are 3 additional lessons for Patron Members and 3 class starters for Instructors from this video, so please join us in those programs to see them!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

 

 

 

Copyright Disclaimer. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Two Stark Reminders of the Importance of Firearms Safety

Self-defenders must ALWAYS practice the rules of firearms safety, and these two stark reminders drive that point home. Never take a moment off from firearms safety, friends. Never.

 

If you value what we do at ASP, would you consider becoming an ASP Patron Member to support the work it takes to make the narrated videos like this reminder of the importance of firearms safety? https://get-asp.com/patron gives the details and benefits.

 

Find a good instructor in your area and get some training: https://get-asp.com/directory

 

 

In the first video, I only have an imgur GIFV: http://i.imgur.com/0tkwO3v.gifv

 

In the second, news stories abound: https://get-asp.com/whi0 and https://get-asp.com/kdsa shows that the police tried to cover up the fratricide; https://get-asp.com/r0tr and https://get-asp.com/ptq2 have the details of the incident.

 

What do these videos teach us about practicing firearms safety?

 

  1. The rules of firearm safety apply in a gunfight, just like they do on the range or in your home. Whether you prefer to articulate them as Colonel Cooper’s four rules or the NRA’s three rules (I have a discussion of my preference here: https://get-asp.com/cfgf if you want to read it), you must have the presence of mind to keep your firearm pointed in the appropriate direction and only fire when you will not hit an innocent. You are morally and legally responsible for the rounds that leave your gun, so make sure to train and practice so that you take responsible shots in the moment of need.

 

  1. The first rule of firearms safety is to always keep your firearm pointed in a safe direction. ALWAYS keep your firearm pointed in a safe direction! A safe direction is one that is never pointed at someone who is not a deadly threat to you or others, and will minimize property damage if the firearm were to have a negligent discharge. If you follow this first rule, even if you somehow discharge the firearm, no one will be hurt and that’s the biggest goal.

 

  1. The second rule of firearms safety is to keep your finger off the trigger until you’re ready to fire! I like to bolster that rule by framing it as “keep your fingers completely out of the trigger guard until you’ve decided to fire.”

 

  1. You’re responsible for every bullet that leaves the muzzle of your firearm, especially for bullets that leave the muzzle because of your negligence. You are 100% going to face consequences for negligent discharge of a firearm, so never neglect your safety rules. Always keep your brain engaged with a firearm in your hands. The second you have it in hand, THINK!

 

  1. Spiritual fitness is an important part of Active Self Protection. You don’t often get any advance notice of the last day of your life, but we see over and over that self-defense isn’t a guarantee of winning every fight you might be placed in. You want to be at peace with your loved ones and with Jesus, because you’ll need that peace on the day that you meet Him. Since you can’t guarantee advanced notice, make peace today.

 

There are 3 additional lessons for Patron Members and 3 class starters for Instructors from this video, so please join us in those programs to see them!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

 

 

 

Copyright Disclaimer. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Las Vegas Police Save the Life of a Man Who Shot at Them (Bloody)

These Las Vegas police officers had to think fast and have tools and skills to save the life of a man who shot at them and endangered many. They stopped the threat and saved a life, and for that they should be commended highly! This one is bloody, so beware. But it teaches important Active Self Protection lessons for LEO and CCW alike.

 

If you value what we do at ASP, would you consider becoming an ASP Patron Member to support the work it takes to make the narrated videos like these Las Vegas officers saving a man’s life after stopping his threat? https://get-asp.com/patron gives the details and benefits.

 

Find a good instructor in your area and get some training: https://get-asp.com/directory

 

 

As with all officer involved shootings, there are numerous news stories to go along with this one. I like the Las Vegas Review Journal reporting the best.

 

Initial report: https://get-asp.com/6ahr and a follow-up with details https://get-asp.com/e6kz

 

The officers involved are identified: https://get-asp.com/fl1t

 

What does this video teach us about defending ourselves against someone shooting at us?

 

  1. Evil exists in our world, and no amount of wishing it away does so. Evil people do evil things, and good people must be ready and willing to stand between them and innocent people and do enough violence to stop them definitively. No amount of negotiation will make truly evil people change their ways; only those willing and able to stop them who use attitude, skills, and plan effectively can. This guy was running and shooting and didn’t care who he hurt to get away.

 

  1. Our defensive strategy is always dictated by our mission. It’s worth remembering that the mission of military members (to overwhelm the enemy with force and drive them from the battlefield) is different than the mission of law enforcement officers (to protect and serve the public interest by subduing and arresting those suspected of crime) is different than the mission of armed private citizens (to protect their loved ones from harm by breaking contact effectively with violent criminals). Those varied missions will dictate what skills are needed and what tactics are employed! Non-sworn don’t chase stolen cars or run down fleeing suspects, as these Las Vegas police officers had to as part of their job. So even while we all learn lessons from the action, we must note that the differing roles mean differing goals and differing priorities.

 

  1. The human body is designed to take a ridiculous amount of punishment and still function. You can shoot someone multiple times and they can still pose a deadly threat! Even mortally wounded people can continue to pose a threat for several seconds to even minutes after being shot, so don’t think for a moment that shooting someone will necessarily immediately incapacitate them. That is Hollywood myth. These officers had a man shooting AT them, and at others, who kept moving for the gun for a long time.

 

  1. The rules of firearm safety apply in a gunfight, just like they do on the range or in your home. Whether you prefer to articulate them as Colonel Cooper’s four rules or the NRA’s three rules (I have a discussion of my preference here: https://get-asp.com/cfgf if you want to read it), you must have the presence of mind to keep your firearm pointed in the appropriate direction and only fire when you will not hit an innocent. You are morally and legally responsible for the rounds that leave your gun, so make sure to train and practice so that you take responsible shots in the moment of need. I am not trying to say that the officer did a poor job here, and he self-corrected, and it’s really hard to stay aware in a real gunfight, but it’s also the time where friendly fire can have disastrous results. Keep the rules of firearms safety in your soul!

 

  1. Having a good tourniquet as part of your trauma medical kit is simple and necessary. NAEMT has a great PowerPoint on their need and use. (and another great resource here) There is a lot of misinformation and old information on tourniquets in the defensive world, but modern tourniquet technique says they can be applied for two hours without causing loss of limb. As for which one to carry, I strongly recommend either the Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT) or the SOFT-T Wide. The best way I have found to carry it compactly is in a PHLster Flat Pack carrier. Keeping a tourniquet on your person and knowing how to apply it could save your life or the life of someone you love, so don’t forget it! This officer having his tourniquet on his person rather than in the car may well have saved this man’s life.

 

There are 3 additional lessons for Patron Members and 3 class starters for Instructors from this video, so please join us in those programs to see them!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

 

 

 

Copyright Disclaimer. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Another Reminder that Firearms Safety Rules Matter

Firearms safety is the responsibility of every user of firearms. If you can’t follow them, all the time, then don’t carry one. This is a reminder of what happens when you disregard them!

 

If you value what we do at ASP, would you consider becoming an ASP Patron Member to support the work it takes to make the narrated videos like this terrible firearms safety rules violation? https://get-asp.com/patron gives the details and benefits.

 

Find a good instructor in your area and get some training: https://get-asp.com/directory

 

 

News stories from local news (Google Translate required): https://get-asp.com/p6bk and https://get-asp.com/y5l2

 

What does this video teach us about firearms safety?

 

  1. The number one reason for negligent discharge with a firearm is complacency with the Rules of Firearms Safety. When your firearm stops being something you respect as dangerous, you can easily get complacent with treating it as a deadly force multiplier, and that complacency in handling leads to negligent discharges. The correction to that is to always remember that it’s a dangerous tool, and to treat it with respect! (I see the same kind of thing with driving and motorcycle riding; once you forget it’s a dangerous tool, bad things are coming)
  2. Administrative firearm handling is dangerous. If you don’t NEED to be handling your firearm, DON’T. When the gun is not properly stored, holstered, or slung but is rather in your hands, it is a dangerous time. Recognize that whenever you handle your firearm in an administrative task (holstering in the morning, loading, unloading and showing clear on the range, inspection, unloading for dry fire work, etc.) that you’re doing something very dangerous and practice the rules of safe firearms handling religiously!

 

  1. The first rule of firearms safety is to always keep your firearm pointed in a safe direction. ALWAYS keep your firearm pointed in a safe direction! A safe direction is one that is never pointed at someone who is not a deadly threat to you or others, and will minimize property damage if the firearm were to have a negligent discharge. If you follow this first rule, even if you somehow discharge the firearm, no one will be hurt and that’s the biggest goal.

 

  1. The second rule of firearms safety is to keep your finger off the trigger until you’re ready to fire! I like to bolster that rule by framing it as “keep your fingers completely out of the trigger guard until you’ve decided to fire.” Had this guard not been stupid enough to put his finger on the trigger, his friend wouldn’t have been shot.

 

  1. First aid skills are important. If you’re going to train and prepare to take a life to defend yourself, you should also have skills, training, and equipment to save life should you need to. (I carry an individual first aid kit at a minimum: http://amzn.to/1Or4yVz ) Often that will not involve defensive encounters, and in a defensive encounter your primary responsibility is to yourself and your loved ones.

 

There are 3 additional lessons for Patron Members and 3 class starters for Instructors from this video, so please join us in those programs to see them!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

 

Copyright Disclaimer. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

 

Music in the outro used with permission from Bensound at www.bensound.com

Good Samaritan Saves Officer Being Attacked on Florida Turnpike

I am so grateful that this Good Samaritan had the courage to help this officer. Would you have stepped in or filmed on your phone?

 

If you value what we do at ASP, would you consider becoming an ASP Patron Member to support the work it takes to make the narrated videos like this Good Samaritan helping? https://get-asp.com/patron gives the details and benefits.

 

Find a good instructor in your area and get some training: https://get-asp.com/directory

 

 

News story on the Officer and the Good Samaritan: https://get-asp.com/cw7d

 

Identities of the officer and suspect are in this LEO Affairs story: https://get-asp.com/uigi

 

Comprehensive news story on the Good Samaritan, officer, and suspect in the Washington Post: https://get-asp.com/63vt

 

What does this video teach us about defending ourselves against an attacker and being a Good Samaritan?

 

  1. Part of your training must be knowing when to use verbal commands, and when to abandon verbal commands and move to physical or deadly force. Many times self-defenders (and LEO) get caught in a loop of issuing the same command repeatedly to no effect. Using verbal commands is an important part of your force options training, and part of that training in verbal commands is knowing when to talk and when to stop talking and act. The Good Samaritan gave the suspect a LOT of opportunities to comply here. Like more than he needed to.

 

  1. Private citizens must consider when and how to step in to help LEO who are struggling with a suspect. I think that it is a morally good thing to step in if possible, because ending the physical conflict helps the officer AND the suspect not to get hurt. (the suspect isn’t getting away…and if he does, he’s going to be in REAL danger when they catch up to him next) If you choose to step in to help an officer, please be sure to (1) announce yourself; (2) ask the officer if they want help (“Officer, do you need help? I can help you if you want me to!”); (3) communicate with the officer what you see and what you’re doing (“I have this arm,” “I have his legs pinned,” etc.); (4) if they want you help, GO AFTER IT rather than being timid. Stop the conflict, help the officer, and end the fight.

 

  1. Empty-handed skills are absolutely critical for self-defenders. First of all, more conflicts you will encounter as a self-defender will require empty-handed skills than will require firearms skills, simply because more self-defense encounters are physical than deadly. Second, since a firearm is a tool of last resort, self-defenders need to have non-lethal options that include empty-handed skills to protect themselves from likely incidents. Third, in the moment of the encounter you may not have the time to get to your gun before you can fight your way to it. We don’t get to see what happened with this officer to get him to the ground, but being able to fight from a grounded position and protect yourself is a necessary skill for firearms users!

 

  1. As one of my martial arts mentors, Skip Hancock, is fond of saying, the ground must be your friend and not your enemy. You must know how to fight on the ground and not panic if the fight goes to the ground! You must have skills from bottom position, from top position, and in the scramble. You must be able to regain your feet and fight from wherever you find yourself. Too many fights require this skill to ignore it!

 

  1. Marksmanship in a real deadly force encounter might mean that you need to be ready to make a precision shot on a threat, and you must be prepared emotionally and skill-wise to do so. Shooting a threat in the face, a target the size of a 3×5 card, under stress is no small feat! To be able to stop a terrorist attack or hostage situation, though, it is a necessary skill and you should train and practice your marksmanship until it is second nature. A good standard is Dave Spaulding’s “Skill on Demand” drill, which involves 2 shots in 2 seconds at 20 feet, in a 3×5 card. This is one such instance, where a precision shot was really needed to get the perp to stop attacking the officer.

 

There are 3 additional lessons for Patron Members and 3 class starters for Instructors from this video, so please join us in those programs to see them!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

 

 

 

Copyright Disclaimer. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Polish Police Take Down Man Wielding Hammer and Crowbar

Whether LE or CCW, there is a lot to learn from these Polish Police confronting a deranged man who is threatening the local population.

 

If you value what we do at ASP, would you consider becoming an ASP Patron Member to support the work it takes to make the narrated videos like these officers confronting this deranged man? https://get-asp.com/patron gives the details and benefits.

 

 

News story on the police shooting this man and its controversy: https://get-asp.com/bzj8

 

UPDATE: there are English subtitles on this original video which shows that this is at least an attempted suicide by cop: https://get-asp.com/89js

 

What does this video teach us about defending ourselves against someone armed with short range tools like a hammer and crowbar?

 

  1. You must know the range of your force multiplier and the range of various force multipliers that might be used against you. Hammers and crowbars are short-range, fast moving force multipliers. If thrown, they become single use, long range force multipliers. Firearms are extremely long-range, fast moving force multipliers.

 

  1. If you have a firearm out, distance is your friend. A firearm has a functionally infinite range in a deadly force encounter. (yes, I know, that’s not 100% true…for the purposes of a self-defense fight, it is functionally true) If you are at contact distance to someone you have a firearm aimed at, you give them the ability to fight you for your firearm and negate the advantage you have. Therefore, if you have a gun on someone, stay out of range of their hands if at all possible!

 

  1. If you have a partner with you when you’re attacked (be it a LEO partner if you work on a team, or your spouse or martial artist buddy), you want to do everything you can to work as a team. Knowing each other well and communicating clearly will help you protect yourself from danger. This takes training and practice and commitment, but two partners working together present a formidable challenge to any attacker.

 

  1. In the moment of need, the old saying goes that you will not rise to the occasion but fall to the level of your training. Usually, you’ll fall to the level of your WORST DAY in training. That means you want to train hard, train regularly, and make no excuses (to paraphrase one of my martial arts mentors, Skip Hancock) so that your worst day is good enough for the fight you’re in.

 

  1. Whether you’re LEO or CCW, you need to know what force options you have available and when to abandon one and move to another. (“force options” are a better model than the older “force continuum” model) You need to know when your pepper spray is the best option, or when to abandon it (or the TASER) in favor of your firearm in a split-second decision. The best way, of course, to learn and embed these options in your mind is to train in force on force scenarios with the options and then respond to the situations appropriately. Against a hammer and crowbar, a less-lethal option like a TASER or OC spray wouldn’t have been appropriate.

 

There are 3 additional lessons for Patron Members and 3 class starters for Instructors from this video, so please join us in those programs to see them!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

 

 

 

Copyright Disclaimer. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Armed Suspect Shows How Fast Deadly Force Encounters Are

If you value what we do at ASP, would you consider becoming an ASP Patron Member to support the work it takes to make the narrated videos like this deadly force encounter? https://get-asp.com/patron gives the details and benefits.

 

The officer won this deadly force encounter with an armed suspect with only FRACTIONS of a second to spare. This is how fast gunfights go down!

 

 

Multiple news stories on this deadly force encounter and the armed suspect, including details that he was out on bail for drug and gun offenses (having been released the day before) and was a suspect in a murder investigation:

 

https://get-asp.com/v3gw

 

https://get-asp.com/wao2

 

https://get-asp.com/xs1b

 

What does this officer involved deadly force encounter teach us about defending ourselves from an attack?

 

  1. Evil exists in our world, and no amount of wishing it away does so. Evil people do evil things, and good people must be ready and willing to stand between them and innocent people and do enough violence to stop them definitively. No amount of negotiation will make truly evil people change their ways; only those willing and able to stop them who use attitude, skills, and plan effectively can. This suspect had EVERY chance, and he chose to do evil. Pointing a gun at a police officer is a great way to die, simple as that.

 

  1. The eyes may be the windows to the soul, but the hands are the windows to the intent of a person. If you’re in a potential conflict, ALWAYS pay attention to what the aggressor is doing with their hands. They might have a force multiplier in their hand, or they might be hiding their hand so that you can’t see what is in it or using their hand to conceal something. If their hands are empty, there is a difference between someone with fists and someone whose hands are open and relaxed. As a self-defender your situational awareness must include seeing the hands of any potential threat in your vicinity, so watch the hands! Officer Kinland saw the gun in Deal’s hand, and because of that was able to act.

 

  1. The “fleeing felon rule” generally applies to Law Enforcement Officers in the performance of their duties, and since 1985’s Tennessee vs. Garner decision the ability to use deadly force to apprehend a fleeing felon by LEO has been limited to cases where the officer has probable cause to believe that the fleeing felon is a continuing threat of serious physical harm to the officer or the public. However, how that law applies to non-LEO varies state by state. Make sure to know your local laws so that you know the limitations of shooting a fleeing felon, especially if you’re not a police officer. This deadly force encounter isn’t really about shooting a fleeing felon because Deal turned and raised his gun at Officer Kinland, but the point is still worth reminding us all about.

 

  1. Marksmanship matters! The old saying is quite true: you can’t miss fast enough to win a gunfight. As a self-defender you need to practice and train to put your first shot on target as fast as you can, but the key is to put as many shots on target as possible. Usually the first person to put shots on target wins the gunfight. (not always, but usually) So putting the first shot on target every time and quickly is imperative.

 

  1. The rules of firearm safety apply in a gunfight, just like they do on the range or in your home. Whether you prefer to articulate them as Colonel Cooper’s four rules or the NRA’s three rules (I have a discussion of my preference here: https://get-asp.com/cfgf if you want to read it), you must have the presence of mind to keep your firearm pointed in the appropriate direction and only fire when you will not hit an innocent. You are morally and legally responsible for the rounds that leave your gun, so make sure to train and practice so that you take responsible shots in the moment of need.

 

There are 3 additional lessons for Patron Members and 3 class starters for Instructors from this video, so please join us in those programs to see them!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

 

 

 

Copyright Disclaimer. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Officer Hits Himself in Hand While Engaging Charging Suspect

A gunfight is chaotic and stressful, which is what we see in this officer body cam for sure. It’s another reason to train your firearm safety skills to the point of unconscious competence!

 

 

If you value what we do at ASP, would you consider becoming an ASP Patron Member to support the work it takes to make the narrated videos like this officer involved shooting? https://get-asp.com/patron gives the details.

 

Significant details on Officer Braun and the incident from local news: https://get-asp.com/wirk

 

What does this officer teach us about firearms safety in a gunfight?

 

  1. It is critical to know not only how to shoot from the “press out” position, but also from high compressed ready and from retention. Being able to shoot from a high compressed ready as well as from retention are vital skills for all self-defenders to have, because drawing the firearm and using it when there is a threat within arms-length means not pressing it out to use it effectively. You must have the ability to use it in close quarters without endangering your firearm.

 

  1. The rules of firearm safety apply in a gunfight, just like they do on the range or in your home. Whether you prefer to articulate them as Colonel Cooper’s four rules or the NRA’s three rules (I have a discussion of my preference here: https://get-asp.com/cfgf if you want to read it), you must have the presence of mind to keep your firearm pointed in the appropriate direction and only fire when you will not hit an innocent. You are morally and legally responsible for the rounds that leave your gun, so make sure to train and practice so that you take responsible shots in the moment of need.

 

  1. One of the significant dangers in using your defensive firearm is to your support hand. This is usually only in play in a very close-range defensive shooting, say 6 feet or less. What we see happen on video regularly is that if a threat closes within about 2 arms lengths rapidly, the natural tendency is to release the support hand from the pistol and use it as a barrier to the attacker getting too close. The danger there is in floating the support hand out in front of the muzzle and shooting yourself! In training, that means we must drill and drill and drill the thumb pectoral index which minimizes the risk to the support hand, as well as drilling keeping the support hand close to ward off blows while using the firearm in defense.

 

  1. It’s not easy to drop what’s already in your hands to put both hands on the gun. In the moment of a gunfight there’s a tendency to keep whatever is in your hand where it is and shoot one-handed, though of course two-handed shooting is faster and more accurate. It’s worth it to train with something in your hand or hands that you have to drop to get your gun, just to be in the habit of dropping it when the need arises! It’s also a smart idea, if possible, to have a light on your firearm (I use this one: http://amzn.to/21qy0aW if you’re interested) so that when the gun comes out you have a bright light to illuminate your target while keeping both hands on the gun.

 

  1. It takes great training to do successfully, but it’s worth noting that moving backwards should be our least preferred method of gaining distance in a gunfight. When you’re moving backward with a threat in front of you it is very easy to hit an obstacle and lose your footing, which allows the threat to close the distance while you’re off balance. If possible, move diagonally or laterally to get “off the line” of attack and still engage the threat with your firearm.

 

There are 3 additional lessons for Patron Members and 3 class starters for Instructors from this video, so please join us in those programs to see them!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

 

 

 

Copyright Disclaimer. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Negligent Discharge in Retail Store Caught on Camera

If you think you’re immune to negligent discharge of your firearm, you’ll get complacent like this guard in a retail store did. And then, you’ll have a negligent discharge. Hopefully you don’t kill someone in the process. Learn and remember the rules of safe firearms handling!

 

 

If you value what we do at ASP, would you consider becoming an ASP Patron Member to support the work it takes to make the narrated videos like this negligent discharge caught on camera? https://get-asp.com/patron gives the details.

 

A bit of news on this one, mostly that it’s from Venezuela: https://get-asp.com/baay

 

What does this video teach us about the administrative gun handling and negligent discharge?

 

  1. The rules of firearm safety apply in a gunfight, just like they do on the range or in your home. Whether you prefer to articulate them as Colonel Cooper’s four rules or the NRA’s three rules (I have a discussion of my preference here: https://get-asp.com/cfgf if you want to read it), you must have the presence of mind to keep your firearm pointed in the appropriate direction and only fire when you will not hit an innocent. You are morally and legally responsible for the rounds that leave your gun, so make sure to train and practice so that you take responsible shots in the moment of need.

 

  1. The number one reason for negligent discharge with a firearm is complacency with the Rules of Firearms Safety. When your firearm stops being something you respect as dangerous, you can easily get complacent with treating it as a deadly force multiplier, and that complacency in handling leads to negligent discharges. The correction to that is to always remember that it’s a dangerous tool, and to treat it with respect! (I see the same kind of thing with driving and motorcycle riding; once you forget it’s a dangerous tool, bad things are coming)

 

  1. Administrative firearm handling is dangerous. If you don’t NEED to be handling your firearm, DON’T. When the gun is not properly stored, holstered, or slung but is rather in your hands, it is a dangerous time. Recognize that whenever you handle your firearm in an administrative task (holstering in the morning, loading, unloading and showing clear on the range, inspection, unloading for dry fire work, etc.) that you’re doing something very dangerous and practice the rules of safe firearms handling religiously!

 

  1. The first rule of firearms safety is to always keep your firearm pointed in a safe direction. ALWAYS keep your firearm pointed in a safe direction! A safe direction is one that is never pointed at someone who is not a deadly threat to you or others, and will minimize property damage if the firearm were to have a negligent discharge. If you follow this first rule, even if you somehow discharge the firearm, no one will be hurt and that’s the biggest goal.

 

  1. The second rule of firearms safety is to keep your finger off the trigger until you’re ready to fire! I like to bolster that rule by framing it as “keep your fingers completely out of the trigger guard until you’ve decided to fire.

 

There are 3 additional lessons for Patron Members and 3 class starters for Instructors from this video, so please join us in those programs to see them!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

 

 

 

Copyright Disclaimer. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Self-Defender Inexplicably Faces Charges for Defensive Gun Use

The fact that this self-defender is facing murder charges for this defensive gun use is mind-boggling, as the news stories below show. But there are lots of lessons from the video of the incident for all of us as we practice Active Self Protection!

 

 

If you value what we do at ASP, would you consider becoming an ASP Patron Member to support the work it takes to make the narrated videos like this defensive gun use? https://get-asp.com/patron gives the details.

 

Initial news story on this defensive gun use: https://get-asp.com/6qh8

 

More from the son of the self-defender, Wayne Parish, that also includes the official filing of the indictment and the police report as well as pictures of Parish’s injuries: https://get-asp.com/qzg5

 

News story with local defense attorneys and experts questioning why he was even indicted: https://get-asp.com/nxt4

 

More information from the mother of the deceased and her version of events: https://get-asp.com/9vwt

 

What does this video teach us about the fight after the fight in a defensive gun use?

 

  1. Sometimes the danger that you must protect yourself and your family from isn’t evil, but is rather deranged. People who aren’t in their right faculties can be a real danger to your family, even if they are not inherently evil. You need the attitude, skills, and plan to protect yourself from evil AND from non-evil threats that pop up! Clearly, this young man was breaking into the car and I am not saying he wasn’t responsible for that, but just as clearly he has significant mental issues. That didn’t make him any less of a threat!

 

  1. One of the most significant paradigms of using deadly force is called the may-should-must paradigm. “May” asks whether your force is lawful (and, if LEO, within policy). “Should” asks whether the rewards outweigh the risks of not acting or of unintended consequences. “Must” asks whether this is the only course of action that can affect the necessary outcome. Knowing how to apply this paradigm in deadly force encounters, in the moment, is an important responsibility for self-defenders! It certainly appears that Parish met the “must” threshold when Charles McDonald rushed him and tried to take his firearm away from him.

 

  1. We must each decide what is worth protecting. Life is always worth protecting because it is of inestimable worth; as unique bearers of the image of God, people are the most valuable “thing” imaginable. Property is something else, though. With property we always have to balance the benefit against the risk to ourselves and our families. Even where it’s legally allowed, you should consider whether it’s wise or prudent to defend your property, because doing so puts you at risk and not just the bad guy. It was totally within Parish’s rights to stop McDonald from breaking into the car on his property, but it’s worth considering that he put himself at great risk to do so.

 

  1. We must each be ready to face the cost of defending ourselves or others, as well as the cost of not defending. If you defend yourself, especially with a firearm, you might well face significant costs financially, socially, spiritually, emotionally, and relationally. You must be ready for those costs! The same holds true of defending others, and you must decide if the costs are worth paying for your family. You can expect to hire an attorney, spend time in jail perhaps, face social pressure from the media or family or your church, etc. That doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t step in, but it does mean that you have to count the cost and accept it. Certainly, to defend your life or the life of a family member, any cost is bearable. But whether you’re willing to pay that cost for a stranger is a matter for personal reflection and consideration. This is why I strongly recommend that every self-defender have SOME kind of defensive legal protection for the fight after the fight. My comparison of the major players can be found at get-asp.com/protcomp if you need help finding a good one.

 

  1. As well-meaning as police officers are, they cannot protect you from danger. As the old adage says, “When seconds count, the police are only minutes away!” You—and ONLY you—can protect yourself from danger when it comes upon you. A police response time of 5 minutes is considered perfectly acceptable in most suburban departments, and times upwards of 30 minutes can be the norm in rural areas! You need to have the attitude, skills, and plan to protect yourself from harm because the police simply can’t.

 

There are 3 additional lessons for Patron Members and 3 class starters for Instructors from this video, so please join us in those programs to see them!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

 

 

 

Copyright Disclaimer. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.