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Victim Wrestles Gun Away From Home Invader

Would you have been able to protect yourself from this home invader? This homeowner wasn’t looking for trouble, but when it came his way he covered his Active Self Protection and handled his business!

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original video of the home invader, along with news story: https://get-asp.com/ow7m

 

How do I protect myself from a home invader?

 

  1. The Five Ds are a tool that we use at ASP to organize our training and preparation for defending ourselves against an armed attacker when we are not armed ourselves. (or if we are armed but outdrawn such that we must deal with the problem with our hands) Deflect, Dominate, Distract, Disarm, Disable. We pursue the Five Ds from first to last, in order, to give us the best chance of successfully defending ourselves against an armed opponent. Deflect their force multiplier, Dominate as much as possible (best is the whole person, second is the arm with the tool, last is the tool itself), Distract the attacker (usually using pain, redirection, movement, etc.), Disarm the attacker, and Disable the attacker. In this victim the victim had to overpower the home invader, and it worked but it took a long time and wasn’t a given for quite some time. A distraction like a punch or kick or joint lock would have made it easier for sure!

 

  1. In a deadly force encounter, decisions of life and death will be made in the blink of an eye. On the range and in class we have time to consider and to think and to reset and to make multiple attempts, but when the balloon goes up in real life you’ve got fractions of seconds to decide what the best course of action is to protect yourself. The way to be better at decision making in the heat of the moment is training, specifically scenario training and force-on-force training that is designed to work on decision-making skills under stress. It’s offered all over the country, so get training! If you read the news story, this home invader had an unloaded gun; that said, the victim never could have known that in the moment.

 

  1. Transitional spaces are places where we MUST be more careful of potential attack. A transitional space is any location that (1) allows attackers to prey on potential victims with an element of surprise and (2) provides ready escape for the attackers. The garage entrance is certainly a transitional space for most homes because of the places a home invader can hide, and the fact that most people aren’t as aware when they are in their homes.

 

  1. In any territorial or predatorial violence, the attacker gets to set the time and circumstances of the attack. They will almost always launch that attack from ambush, or as we like to call it in Umas, from “obscurity.” Surviving that ambush is one of the most important keys to successfully defending yourself. Clearly this home invader timed his ambush to get the jump on the victim, but thankfully the victim survived the ambush and came out on top. Train to survive the ambush!

 

  1. As well-meaning as police officers are, they cannot protect you from danger. As the old adage says, “When seconds count, the police are only minutes away!” You—and ONLY you—can protect yourself from danger when it comes upon you. A police response time of 5 minutes is considered perfectly acceptable in most suburban departments, and times upwards of 30 minutes can be the norm in rural areas! You need to have the attitude, skills, and plan to protect yourself from a home invader because the police simply can’t.

 

  1. Empty-handed skills are absolutely critical for self-defenders. First of all, more conflicts you will encounter as a self-defender will require empty-handed skills than will require firearms skills, simply because more self-defense encounters are physical than deadly. Second, since a firearm is a tool of last resort, self-defenders need to have non-lethal options that include empty-handed skills to protect themselves from likely incidents. Third, in the moment of the encounter you may not have the time to get to your gun before you can fight your way to it. Even if the victim in this instance was armed, the home invader closed the distance too fast to draw a gun immediately. Empty-handed skills saved the day!

 

  1. Fights are physically demanding. Sure, a pure gunfight might last 10 seconds and not place a huge burden on you physically, but the vast majority of encounters we see here at ASP involve physical self-defense as well. Getting into a honest-to-goodness fight with a home invader is incredibly physically demanding, so being physically fit is an important part of maximizing your chances to protect yourself. Fit people are harder to beat and harder to kill!

 

  1. As one of my martial arts mentors, Skip Hancock, is fond of saying, the ground must be your friend and not your enemy. You must know how to fight on the ground and not panic if the fight goes to the ground, which is where this home invader took it! You must have skills from bottom position, from top position, and in the scramble. You must be able to regain your feet and fight from wherever you find yourself. Too many fights require this skill to ignore it!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

Dog Attack Forces Officer to Shoot

A dog attack is no joke, and though we don’t see too many of them on video at Active Self Protection, this one definitely showcases some of the challenges you might face if attacked by a dog. This is scary, but it’s also how fast real-life defensive encounters happen!

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original video of the dog attack: https://get-asp.com/js3c

 

More details on the dog attack and its aftermath from local news, including an apology from the dog owner who screams in this video: https://get-asp.com/e9mr

 

What can self-defenders learn from this dog attack?

 

  1. In a deadly force encounter, decisions of life and death will be made in the blink of an eye. This dog attack started in a split second for sure! On the range and in class we have time to consider and to think and to reset and to make multiple attempts, but when the balloon goes up in real life you’ve got fractions of seconds to decide what the best course of action is to protect yourself. The way to be better at decision making in the heat of the moment is training, specifically scenario training and force-on-force training that is designed to work on decision-making skills under stress. It’s offered all over the country, so get training! Getting training against a dog attack in particular is difficult to find, but Force on Force training in general is helpful for stress inoculation and decision-making.

 

  1. If you have a partner with you when you’re attacked (be it a LEO partner if you work on a team, or your spouse or martial artist buddy), you want to do everything you can to work as a team. Knowing each other well and communicating clearly will help you protect yourself from danger. This takes training and practice and commitment, but two partners working together present a formidable challenge to any attacker. In this dog attack the second officer thankfully didn’t take a shot with his partner as his backstop!

 

  1. Marksmanship matters! The old saying is quite true: you can’t miss fast enough to win a gunfight. As a self-defender you need to practice and train to put your first shot on target as fast as you can, but the key is to put as many shots on target as possible. The white dog put a couple of significant bites on the officer in this dog attack, and getting shots on target quickly saved him from injury.

 

  1. In a gunfight, movement is your friend. The officer didn’t stand still for the dog attack here! You must be ready not only to draw and fire, but to draw and fire while moving laterally, back, and diagonally. You simply will not stand still in a deadly force encounter because it is against every instinct you have when in mortal danger! People who focus too much on stance or isosceles vs. Weaver forget this fact, but as self-defenders we must know that we will be moving. So practice and train movement on the draw and fire. This is a great reason to have airsoft trainers and practice draw and move in your dry-fire regimen as well.

 

  1. Our goal as self-defenders is to stop the threat. We are not vigilantes and we are not out to kill, we seek to stop the threat against us. Shooting to wound will not stop the threat reliably, and neither will shooting an attacker in an extremity. The only reliably means to stop an aggressor who means us death or grievous bodily harm is to put shots in the center of their available mass to cause nervous system collapse or bleeding out. (exsanguination is the technical term) In this dog attack it meant two shots to center mass of the first dog, then reassessing the second dog and NOT pulling the trigger. Great work by the officer!

 

  1. The rules of firearm safety apply whether you’re training or fighting for your life. One of the most difficult to follow in a real life gunfight is Colonel Cooper’s Rule #4: be sure of your target and what lies beyond it. It is exceedingly difficult to do, but self-defenders must stay aware of what is behind their threat so that they take minimal risks to innocents when defending themselves. The backup officer responded to this dog attack as best he could, and because he didn’t have a decent backstop he didn’t shoot. Good work.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

Officer Involved Shooting Shows The Speed Of Life and Death Decisions

Do you have the attitude, skills, and plan to protect yourself at this kind of speed? At Active Self Protection we have great respect for Law Enforcement Officers (LEO) because we know that they have to make decisions like this officer involved shooting every day. These officers did what they had to in the moment, though of course the outcome is not what they wanted.

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original videos and information about the officer involved shooting from local news here: https://get-asp.com/6itj

 

What does this officer involved shooting teach LEO and CCW alike?

 

  1. In a deadly force encounter, decisions of life and death will be made in the blink of an eye. On the range and in class we have time to consider and to think and to reset and to make multiple attempts, but when the balloon goes up in real life you’ve got fractions of seconds to decide what the best course of action is to protect yourself. The way to be better at decision making in the heat of the moment is training, specifically scenario training and force-on-force training that is designed to work on decision-making skills under stress. It’s offered all over the country, so get training! This officer involved shooting shows a lot of lessons, but this is the most important in my mind.

 

  1. One of the five pillars of lawful, moral self-defense is “imminence,” (get a nutshell here: http://get-asp.com/wbbp or the whole concept here: http://get-asp.com/1fqe). Imminence means the threat is happening RIGHT NOW, that it’s neither too late nor too early for you to defend yourself! The standard of imminence is seen as a triad of ability, opportunity, and jeopardy (also known as the AOJ triad, which is explained here: http://get-asp.com/pm3k in some detail). This officer involved shooting is clearly at a time of imminent threat to the officers, so imminence is met here. This is an important concept to master as self-defenders.

 

  1. If you have a partner with you when you’re attacked (be it a LEO partner if you work on a team, or your spouse or martial artist buddy), you want to do everything you can to work as a team. Knowing each other well and communicating clearly will help you protect yourself from danger. This takes training and practice and commitment, but two partners working together present a formidable challenge to any attacker. These officers worked together to stay out of one another’s line of fire and to work as a team to end the threat. While an officer involved shooting is never an officer’s desire, they train for this.

 

  1. Marksmanship matters! The old saying is quite true: you can’t miss fast enough to win a gunfight. As a self-defender you need to practice and train to put your first shot on target as fast as you can, but the key is to put as many shots on target as possible. This officer involved shooting wasn’t a knife fight because they put shots on target quickly, which was critical to ending the threat.

 

  1. In a gunfight, movement is your friend. You must be ready not only to draw and fire, but to draw and fire while moving laterally, back, and diagonally. You simply will not stand still in a gunfight because it is against every instinct you have when in mortal danger! People who focus too much on stance or isosceles vs. Weaver forget this fact, but as self-defenders we must know that we will be moving. So practice and train movement on the draw and fire. This is a great reason to have airsoft trainers and practice draw and move in your dry-fire regimen as well. This officer involved shooting would have been MUCH worse if the officers had tried to hold their ground and fire rather than moving away from the threat.

 

  1. Our goal as self-defenders is to stop the threat. We are not vigilantes and we are not out to kill, we seek to stop the threat against us. Shooting to wound will not stop the threat reliably, and neither will shooting an attacker in an extremity. The only reliably means to stop an aggressor who means us death or grievous bodily harm is to put shots in the center of their available mass to cause nervous system collapse or bleeding out. (exsanguination is the technical term) It’s clear in the dash cam from this officer involved shooting that the officers stopped shooting when he fell, which is the right decision in that instance.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)

Officer Murdered By Robbery Accomplice

We certainly wish that every deadly force encounter ended with good people safe and bad people not, but the reality is that every robbery is a chance for good people to die. We hope that Active Self Protection helps good people protect themselves, and that involves learning from the good incidents and the bad ones. How do you think we can train to minimize these risks?

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original video with some details on the robbery here: http://get-asp.com/q4rq

 

How do I protect myself from a robbery?

 

  1. Situational awareness is your best friend. It doesn’t mean that you always are paranoid or living in “condition orange,” but it does mean that you know Col. Cooper’s color code of awareness and you live by it. Pay attention to your surroundings, and recognize that when you’re in public places you need to be more aware of your surroundings than when you’re in private. This robbery is not time for condition yellow, but condition RED. The officer is actively defending himself and everyone around him. Yes, that means “head on a swivel” is the only way to truly be. Yes, that is incredibly difficult.

 

  1. In a deadly force encounter, decisions of life and death will be made in the blink of an eye. On the range and in class we have time to consider and to think and to reset and to make multiple attempts, but when the balloon goes up in real life you’ve got fractions of seconds to decide what the best course of action is to protect yourself. The way to be better at decision making in the heat of the moment is training, specifically scenario training and force-on-force training that is designed to work on decision-making skills under stress. It’s offered all over the country, so get training! Do force on force training that involves unknown contacts and extra opponents, like we see in this robbery. It might save your life.

 

  1. In a gunfight, movement is your friend. You must be ready not only to draw and fire, but to draw and fire while moving laterally, back, and diagonally. You simply will not stand still in a gunfight because it is against every instinct you have when in mortal danger! People who focus too much on stance or isosceles vs. Weaver forget this fact, but as self-defenders we must know that we will be moving. So practice and train movement on the draw and fire. This is a great reason to have airsoft trainers and practice draw and move in your dry-fire regimen as well. This robbery shows how fluid a gunfight is, and how much movement actually happens.

 

  1. Spiritual fitness is an important part of Active Self Protection. You don’t often get any advance notice of the last day of your life, but we see over and over that self-defense isn’t a guarantee of winning every fight you might be placed in. You want to be at peace with God, because you’ll need that peace on the day that you meet Him. Since you can’t guarantee advanced notice, make peace today. This officer wasn’t expecting to intervene in a robbery, and wasn’t expecting to meet his Maker that day.

 

  1. We must never settle for being able to protect ourselves against a lone attacker because of how common multiple attacker engagements are. Rats travel in packs, so we must always be prepared to face multiple attackers! This robbery involved at least 3 or 4 robbers, and multiple attackers are the norm.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)

Carjacking Turns into a Gunfight

Could you have won the fight BEFORE the fight here? Practicing Active Self Protection could help keep a carjacking like this from even happening, but in the moment what do you think the victim’s best solution was?

Original video and news story: http://get-asp.com/e1z5

How do I protect myself from a carjacking?

1. Never leave your keys in your car or the car running if you are away from it. Period, end of subject. The only time you can leave a car running is if your car is equipped with a remote starter that can leave it running while you take the keys and lock the car on the way out. And of course, never leave vulnerable people like children or elderly parents in a car without someone to protect them. If you’re all they have, take them with you. A carjacking with kids in the car is unthinkable.

2. A life of self-protection must be dedicated to avoidance, de-escalation, and escape whenever possible. You win 100% of the fights that you don’t get in, so make a commitment to de-escalate, escape, or evade any encounter you possibly can. Having good situational awareness will give you more time and opportunity to see problems coming and formulate a plan to stay away and protect yourself without danger to yourself or others. This is always our first choice as self-defenders.

3. Keep your firearm on your person! Plenty of people keep a firearm stationed near them under the counter or on a desk, but in the moment of need you can’t ever be sure that you can get to it if it’s not on your person. Imagine if this CCW holder had kept his gun in his glove box or map pocket. He would have been in even more trouble!

4. In a gunfight, movement is your friend. You must be ready not only to draw and fire, but to draw and fire while moving laterally, back, and diagonally. You simply will not stand still in a gunfight because it is against every instinct you have when in mortal danger! People who focus too much on stance or isosceles vs. Weaver forget this fact, but as self-defenders we must know that we will be moving. So practice and train movement on the draw and fire. This is a great reason to have airsoft trainers and practice draw and move in your dry-fire regimen as well.

5. The human body is designed to take a ridiculous amount of punishment and still function. You can shoot someone multiple times and they can still pose a deadly threat! Even mortally wounded people can continue to pose a threat for several seconds to even minutes after being shot, so don’t think for a moment that shooting someone will necessarily immediately incapacitate them. That is Hollywood myth. Both of these guys were shot and both ran a long way.

6. Transitional spaces are places where we MUST be more careful of potential attack. A transitional space is any location that (1) allows attackers to prey on potential victims with an element of surprise and (2) provides ready escape for the attackers. Convenience stores are always transitional spaces, so take the extra precautions not to make yourself an enticing victim.

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)

Officer Involved Shooting In Florida

This is how fast a gunfight really is. This officer involved shooting shows why we talk at Active Self Protection about being ready before you are in a deadly force encounter, because everything happens so fast it’s ridiculous. Have you tried to hit moving targets while moving, as in a force on force class?

Original video from the Alachua County Sheriff’s Office: http://get-asp.com/62ay

News story with more details: http://get-asp.com/xju1

What does this officer involved shooting teach LEO and CCW alike?

1. To defend against this kind of attack, you need emotional fitness. Emotional fitness is defined as the ability to internally represent a situation or predicament to yourself in such a way as to make you strong and able to successfully defend yourself against it. Repeated practice and thousands of reps of sparring and self-defense absolutely build your emotional fitness to be able to handle whatever comes your way. These officers hung in the fight and put enough shots on target to be effective, which is awesome. They used bowling words because that’s what we sometimes do in these kinds of situations, and that’s okay too!

2. Marksmanship matters! The old saying is quite true: you can’t miss fast enough to win a gunfight. As a self-defender you need to practice and train to put your first shot on target as fast as you can, but the key is to put as many shots on target as possible. It’s usually the first person to put a shot on target that wins the fight, and thankfully that was the officers.

3. Capacity matters. My rule of thumb is that I want a minimum of 5 rounds for each bad guy I might face, which accounts for 2 misses and 3 shots on target for each. (of course, you never want to miss…I am just accommodating me on my worst day) This incident saw 3 of 11 shots find their target, which is in the ballpark of my estimates for all of our worst day. Might you do better? Maybe. Do you want to have any margin for error? YES.

4. In a gunfight, movement is your friend. You must be ready not only to draw and fire, but to draw and fire while moving laterally, back, and diagonally. You simply will not stand still in a gunfight because it is against every instinct you have when in mortal danger! People who focus too much on stance or isosceles vs. Weaver forget this fact, but as self-defenders we must know that we will be moving. So practice and train movement on the draw and fire. This is a great reason to have airsoft trainers and practice draw and move in your dry-fire regimen as well.

5. If you have a partner with you when you’re attacked (be it a LEO partner if you work on a team, or your spouse or martial artist buddy), you want to do everything you can to work as a team. Knowing each other well and communicating clearly will help you protect yourself from danger. This takes training and practice and commitment, but two partners working together present a formidable challenge to any attacker. These officers communicated to one another well, and that helped them end the threat.

6. In the moment of need, the old saying goes that you will not rise to the occasion but fall to the level of your training. Usually, you’ll fall to the level of your WORST DAY in training. That means you want to train hard, train regularly, and make no excuses (to paraphrase one of my martial arts mentors, Skip Hancock) so that your worst day is good enough for the fight you’re in.

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)

Officer Involved Shooting Caught On Video

This officer involved shooting in Costa Rica goes down in a hurry, but also contains some significant lessons for all of us, LEO and CCW alike. Could you have prevailed in this instance?

Original video: http://get-asp.com/tc7e

News story (Google Translate required): http://get-asp.com/c2xh

What does an officer involved shooting teach all of us about self-defense?

1. Marksmanship matters! The old saying is quite true: you can’t miss fast enough to win a gunfight. As a self-defender you need to practice and train to put your first shot on target as fast as you can, but the key is to put as many shots on target as possible. Thankfully, the armed robber’s first shot missed and the officer’s didn’t.

2. In a gunfight, movement is your friend. You must be ready not only to draw and fire, but to draw and fire while moving laterally, back, and diagonally. You simply will not stand still in a gunfight because it is against every instinct you have when in mortal danger! People who focus too much on stance or isosceles vs. Weaver forget this fact, but as self-defenders we must know that we will be moving. So practice and train movement on the draw and fire. This is a great reason to have airsoft trainers and practice draw and move in your dry-fire regimen as well. In this instance we can see from the officer that the second the shooting started, he started running. You need to train to move while you shoot so that in the real thing you do so smartly.

3. Transitional spaces are places where we MUST be more careful of potential attack. A transitional space is any location that (1) allows attackers to prey on potential victims with an element of surprise and (2) provides ready escape for the attackers. I am guessing that this cop wasn’t looking to be involved in an officer involved shooting that day, but as he came through the door of the establishment he walked right into one! When you’re approaching a transitional space, be aware of what is going on inside and outside so that you’re ready for what might come.

4. The human body is designed to take a ridiculous amount of punishment and still function. You can shoot someone multiple times and they can still pose a deadly threat! Even mortally wounded people can continue to pose a threat for several seconds to even minutes after being shot, so don’t think for a moment that shooting someone will necessarily immediately incapacitate them. That is Hollywood myth. In this instance the mortally wounded attacker was still able to chase the officer down for perhaps 5 or 6 seconds after being shot. Lesson: shoot until the threat stops!

5. Capacity matters. My rule of thumb is that I want a minimum of 5 rounds for each bad guy I might face, which accounts for 2 misses and 3 shots on target for each. (of course, you never want to miss…I am just accommodating me on my worst day) This officer involved shooting shows this principle as well, in that the officer took 8 shots just at this one suspect. If he was shooting a 1911, he was out. If he was shooting a neutered 10 round pistol, he had 3 left (considering he loaded a full mag plus one in the chamber). The lesson: carry the highest capacity firearm you can reasonably conceal, and keep a spare magazine with you if at all possible.

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of www.bensound.com)

Officer Involved Shooting Caught On Camera

Do you have the attitude, skills, and plan to survive this kind of attack? This officer involved shooting shows us some important Active Self Protection lessons about how a real deadly force encounter goes down. Would you have come out alive?

News story: http://get-asp.com/la42

Original video (most of it irrelevant): http://get-asp.com/f3j2

What can this officer involved shooting teach LEO and CCW alike?

1. Deadly force encounters seldom announce themselves before they become life or death. There was no escalation or warning in this officer involved shooting; the officer asked the guy to step over where he wanted him, and the knife came out. This looks like “suicide by cop” to me, but the fact remains that knife-wielding attackers seldom telegraph their intentions. You must be ready to go from discussion to deadly force in an instant.

2. I know some people will get frustrated with me for saying it, but this shows that some of our training hinders real life. In a LOT of movement training I see on the range people are taught to shuffle step or drag their feet for safety or so they won’t trip. That’s all well and good for range safety, but if someone’s coming after you with a knife you won’t shuffle step. You’ll run as hard as you can! This makes it very important to work on Force on Force training that involves realistic movement and putting shots on target in less than optimal positions.

3. Shoot to stop the threat. This officer did a great job of shooting until the threat stopped rather than shooting once and admiring his work, and he also did a great job of shooting until the threat stopped and then not shooting any more. Once the perp was down he was not in range with his knife and so the officer stopped shooting.

4. Range matters. A knife is a fast-moving, short-range tool. A firearm is a fast moving, extremely long range (out to 25 yards or so with a pistol for most) tool. That means if you’re wielding the knife, you want to get CLOSE. If you’re wielding the firearm, you want DISTANCE. The tool you have determines your plan.

Attitude. Skills. Plan.