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Two Israeli Knife Attacks Caught On Camera

Have you fought against a knife in real life? Israel is like a powder keg right now, and knife attacks are very common. Practicing Active Self Protection before and during an encounter can help you get out of knife attacks alive, though of course any attack with a knife is scary, bloody, and deadly.

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

News story on the knife attacks and video of the first: https://get-asp.com/l78m

 

Video of the second of the two knife attacks: https://get-asp.com/xlth

 

How do I protect my family from knife attacks?

 

  1. Evil exists in our world, and no amount of wishing it away does so. Evil people do evil things, and good people must be ready and willing to stand between them and innocent people and do enough violence to stop them definitively. No amount of negotiation will make truly evil people change their ways; only those willing and able to stop them who use attitude, skills, and plan effectively can. While someone might argue that the first of the two knife attacks was akin to guerilla warfare (I wouldn’t), the second attack on three ultra-orthodox was clearly unconscionable.

 

  1. In any territorial or predatorial violence, the attacker gets to set the time and circumstances of the attack. They will almost always launch that attack from ambush, or as we like to call it in Umas, from “obscurity.” Surviving that ambush is one of the most important keys to successfully defending yourself. Both of these knife attacks came from obscurity, and the second one shows how important that first response is. Notice that the first and second victim were really in trouble, but the third had enough presence of mind to be able to successfully mount some sort of defense. Surviving the ambush is a key to successful self-defense.

 

  1. To defend against knife attacks, you need emotional fitness. Emotional fitness is defined as the ability to internally represent a situation or predicament to yourself in such a way as to make you strong and able to successfully defend yourself against it. Repeated practice and thousands of reps of sparring and self-defense absolutely build your emotional fitness to be able to handle whatever comes your way.

 

  1. Knife attacks do not happen like you’ve seen in Hollywood. They are brutal, fast, and mean. Stabbing attacks do not generally come from slashes or from any notice whatsoever, but tend to come from concealment and repeatedly stab at a rate of 2-3 stabs per second.

 

  1. Empty-handed skills are absolutely critical for self-defenders. First of all, more conflicts you will encounter as a self-defender will require empty-handed skills than will require firearms skills, simply because more self-defense encounters are physical than deadly. Second, since a firearm is a tool of last resort, self-defenders need to have non-lethal options that include empty-handed skills to protect themselves from likely incidents. Third, in the moment of the encounter you may not have the time to get to your gun before you can fight your way to it. Both of these knife attacks justified firearms use to end them, but neither of them provided the time to get to the gun initially. In the second video the man uses his back and feet to keep the attacker at bay, and if he had a firearm that would have been the time to get to it.

 

  1. As one of my martial arts mentors, Skip Hancock, is fond of saying, the ground must be your friend and not your enemy. You must know how to fight on the ground and not panic if the fight goes to the ground! You must have skills from bottom position, from top position, and in the scramble. You must be able to regain your feet and fight from wherever you find yourself. Too many fights require this skill to ignore it! Both of these knife attacks involved having skills on the ground, and having those skills is important.

 

  1. First aid skills are important. If you’re going to train and prepare to take a life to defend yourself, you should also have skills, training, and equipment to save life should you need to. (I carry this at a minimum: https://get-asp.com/IPOK) Often that will not involve defensive encounters, and in a defensive encounter your primary responsibility is to yourself and your loved ones. Both of these knife attacks involved innocent people taking significant wounds, and having first aid skills can be the difference between life and death.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of Bensound)

Knife Attack in Jerusalem Caught On Camera

We don’t see a knife attack like they show in Hollywood very often, but this type of attack is much more typical. Jerusalem is a scary place right now, and we’re hoping the people there are practicing Active Self Protection! These kinds of attacks happen anywhere, so the lessons apply to us all.

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original video of the knife attack here: https://get-asp.com/g9vk

 

News story with details on the knife attack here: https://get-asp.com/qrae

 

How do I protect myself from a knife attack?

 

  1. If you know there might be danger around (and with the prevalence in Israel of this kind of knife attack, any soldier is in danger), you cannot stand there flat-footed with your hands at your side. That’s a great way to die. Instead, if you think danger might be coming but not imminent, get your hands up protecting your head, neck, and chest. I do this by tucking one hand under the other elbow, and the free hand on my chin as if I were in deep contemplation. Others do it using the “interview position” with both hands as if they’re holding a pad and pen; this is taught in many LEO academies. Getting your hands up shaves split seconds off of your reaction time, but that might make the difference between life and death in a knife attack.

 

  1. In any territorial or predatorial violence, the attacker gets to set the time and circumstances of the attack. They will almost always launch that attack from ambush, or as we like to call it in Umas, from “obscurity.” Surviving that ambush is one of the most important keys to successfully defending yourself from a knife attack or any other kind of attack.

 

  1. The concept of a reactionary gap is important to consider as self-defenders. This is normally taught as something like the “21-foot rule” against a knife attack, though that’s a principle and not a rule. As a self-defender if you’re in a situation where an attack is a possibility, leaving yourself some distance to allow for additional time to respond to an attack from ambush is very smart. Even 2 or 3 feet of additional space allows the reactionary gap to successfully defend the ambush and get into the fight.

 

  1. To defend against this kind of knife attack, you need emotional fitness. Emotional fitness is defined as the ability to internally represent a situation or predicament to yourself in such a way as to make you strong and able to successfully defend yourself against it. Repeated practice and thousands of reps of sparring and self-defense absolutely build your emotional fitness to be able to handle whatever comes your way. Even after being stabbed you need to be able to stay in the fight, and training gives you the emotional fitness to do so.

 

  1. Empty-handed skills are absolutely critical for self-defenders. First of all, more conflicts you will encounter as a self-defender will require empty-handed skills than will require firearms skills, simply because more self-defense encounters are physical than deadly. Second, since a firearm is a tool of last resort, self-defenders need to have non-lethal options that include empty-handed skills to protect themselves from likely incidents. Third, in the moment of the encounter you may not have the time to get to your gun before you can fight your way to it. This soldier had to use his empty-handed skills to protect himself from the knife attack before any of the other soldiers could possibly get their gun in the fight.

 

  1. A real knife attack does not happen like you’ve seen in Hollywood. Knife attacks are brutal, fast, and mean. Stabbing attacks do not generally come from slashes or from any notice whatsoever, but tend to come from concealment and repeatedly stab at a rate of 2-3 stabs per second, whether overhand like this or underhand.

 

  1. You must be able to fight and defend yourself from all different stages of action. One of my martial arts mentors, Skip Hancock, likes to say that we must be able to fight wherever the fight happens to be! So whether we are at contact stage (just able to come in physical contact with our attacker), penetration stage (where attacks can contact and penetrate significantly), or manipulation stage (a clinch or similar where joint and body manipulations are possible), we must be able to use effective technique to protect ourselves. If you’re paying attention to this knife attack, the attacker grabbed the soldier by the neck, putting this fight at manipulation stage.

 

  1. If you have a partner with you when you’re attacked (be it a LEO partner if you work on a team, or your spouse or martial artist buddy), you want to do everything you can to work as a team. This knife attack shows the importance of teamwork! Knowing each other well and communicating clearly will help you protect yourself from danger. This takes training and practice and commitment, but two partners working together present a formidable challenge to any attacker.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

Armed Guard Stops Rampaging Terrorist

A rampaging terrorist like this does not stop because people reason with him. He stops because good people force him to stop by the effective use of force. At Active Self Protection we salute the actions of this armed guard who saved many more people from their deaths.

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original video of this armed guard from Israeli news: https://get-asp.com/tgip

 

News story with more on this terrorist being stopped, and video from another angle: https://get-asp.com/8oh2

 

What does this terrorist teach self-defenders about protecting themselves?

 

  1. Evil exists in our world, and no amount of wishing it away does so. Evil people do evil things, and good people must be ready and willing to stand between them and innocent people and do enough violence to stop them definitively. No amount of negotiation will make truly evil people like a terrorist change their ways; only those willing and able to stop them who use attitude, skills, and plan effectively can.

 

  1. You must accept that danger exists and that it can happen to you. This is the foundational core of spiritual fitness and the first step in taking proactive steps to protect yourself and your loved ones. If you live in a fantasyland that nothing bad can happen because nothing bad has happened in the past, you’re setting yourself up for a terrible letdown. The terrorist didn’t choose his victims based on their affront to him, but simply based on their religion and ethnicity. You can be targeted as well, so be ready.

 

  1. Spiritual fitness is an important part of Active Self Protection. You don’t often get any advance notice of the last day of your life, but we see over and over that self-defense isn’t a guarantee of winning every fight you might be placed in. You want to be at peace with God, because you’ll need that peace on the day that you meet Him. Since you can’t guarantee advanced notice, make peace today. None of the people killed by this terrorist thought this would be their last day, but it was. Be at peace with your loved ones and God.

 

  1. Do not stay in the danger zone if you can possibly help it. So many times people get decision paralysis and freeze, but you cannot stay in a place where a deadly threat exists! Either act to leave the area, or act to protect yourself. Every second you give an attacker is another opportunity they have to do you and yours harm, so don’t allow that. If you can, get out of there immediately. If you can’t, then look for your opportunity to ensure your own safety by whatever means necessary. Any area with a terrorist killing people is a danger zone, so run!

 

  1. The human body is designed to take a ridiculous amount of punishment and still function. You can shoot someone multiple times and they can still pose a deadly threat! Even mortally wounded people can continue to pose a threat for several seconds to even minutes after being shot, so don’t think for a moment that shooting someone will necessarily immediately incapacitate them. That is Hollywood myth. This terrorist was shot multiple times and kept getting up; that is reality.

 

  1. The rules of firearm safety apply whether you’re training or fighting for your life. One of the most difficult to follow in a real life gunfight is Colonel Cooper’s Rule #4: be sure of your target and what lies beyond it. It is exceedingly difficult to do, but self-defenders must stay aware of what is behind their threat so that they take minimal risks to innocents when defending themselves. The armed guard moved around the terrorist until he had a good backstop to shoot from, and that is very wise.

 

  1. Capacity matters. My rule of thumb is that I want a minimum of 5 rounds for each bad guy I might face, which accounts for 2 misses and 3 shots on target for each. (of course, you never want to miss…I am just accommodating me on my worst day) This terrorist took at least 5 rounds to stop, and I would think that most trained people would have put another 5 or 6 in him as quickly as possible as well.

 

  1. Our goal as self-defenders is to stop the threat. We are not vigilantes and we are not out to kill, we seek to stop the threat against us. Shooting to wound will not stop the threat reliably, and neither will shooting an attacker in an extremity. The only reliably means to stop an aggressor who means us death or grievous bodily harm is to put shots in the center of their available mass to cause nervous system collapse or bleeding out. (exsanguination is the technical term) This armed guard did a good job of shooting the terrorist until the threat stopped, and also of staying aware for the threat to return!

 

  1. First aid skills are important. If you’re going to train and prepare to take a life to defend yourself, you should also have skills, training, and equipment to save life should you need to. (I carry this at a minimum: https://get-asp.com/IPOK) Often that will not involve defensive encounters, and in a defensive encounter your primary responsibility is to yourself and your loved ones. This terrorist killed two people instantly, but others clearly needed medical attention quickly as well. Be ready to give it.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of Bensound at http://www.bensound.com)

Officer Involved Shooting Shows The Speed Of Life and Death Decisions

Do you have the attitude, skills, and plan to protect yourself at this kind of speed? At Active Self Protection we have great respect for Law Enforcement Officers (LEO) because we know that they have to make decisions like this officer involved shooting every day. These officers did what they had to in the moment, though of course the outcome is not what they wanted.

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original videos and information about the officer involved shooting from local news here: https://get-asp.com/6itj

 

What does this officer involved shooting teach LEO and CCW alike?

 

  1. In a deadly force encounter, decisions of life and death will be made in the blink of an eye. On the range and in class we have time to consider and to think and to reset and to make multiple attempts, but when the balloon goes up in real life you’ve got fractions of seconds to decide what the best course of action is to protect yourself. The way to be better at decision making in the heat of the moment is training, specifically scenario training and force-on-force training that is designed to work on decision-making skills under stress. It’s offered all over the country, so get training! This officer involved shooting shows a lot of lessons, but this is the most important in my mind.

 

  1. One of the five pillars of lawful, moral self-defense is “imminence,” (get a nutshell here: http://get-asp.com/wbbp or the whole concept here: http://get-asp.com/1fqe). Imminence means the threat is happening RIGHT NOW, that it’s neither too late nor too early for you to defend yourself! The standard of imminence is seen as a triad of ability, opportunity, and jeopardy (also known as the AOJ triad, which is explained here: http://get-asp.com/pm3k in some detail). This officer involved shooting is clearly at a time of imminent threat to the officers, so imminence is met here. This is an important concept to master as self-defenders.

 

  1. If you have a partner with you when you’re attacked (be it a LEO partner if you work on a team, or your spouse or martial artist buddy), you want to do everything you can to work as a team. Knowing each other well and communicating clearly will help you protect yourself from danger. This takes training and practice and commitment, but two partners working together present a formidable challenge to any attacker. These officers worked together to stay out of one another’s line of fire and to work as a team to end the threat. While an officer involved shooting is never an officer’s desire, they train for this.

 

  1. Marksmanship matters! The old saying is quite true: you can’t miss fast enough to win a gunfight. As a self-defender you need to practice and train to put your first shot on target as fast as you can, but the key is to put as many shots on target as possible. This officer involved shooting wasn’t a knife fight because they put shots on target quickly, which was critical to ending the threat.

 

  1. In a gunfight, movement is your friend. You must be ready not only to draw and fire, but to draw and fire while moving laterally, back, and diagonally. You simply will not stand still in a gunfight because it is against every instinct you have when in mortal danger! People who focus too much on stance or isosceles vs. Weaver forget this fact, but as self-defenders we must know that we will be moving. So practice and train movement on the draw and fire. This is a great reason to have airsoft trainers and practice draw and move in your dry-fire regimen as well. This officer involved shooting would have been MUCH worse if the officers had tried to hold their ground and fire rather than moving away from the threat.

 

  1. Our goal as self-defenders is to stop the threat. We are not vigilantes and we are not out to kill, we seek to stop the threat against us. Shooting to wound will not stop the threat reliably, and neither will shooting an attacker in an extremity. The only reliably means to stop an aggressor who means us death or grievous bodily harm is to put shots in the center of their available mass to cause nervous system collapse or bleeding out. (exsanguination is the technical term) It’s clear in the dash cam from this officer involved shooting that the officers stopped shooting when he fell, which is the right decision in that instance.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)

GRAPHIC: Officer Involved Shooting Proves The Fallacy Of Shooting To Wound

WARNING: GRAPHIC. I mean it. Our culture is up in arms about police conduct right now, and I see an awful lot of calls to shoot dangerous people in the leg instead of center mass. This officer involved shooting puts that idea to rest, once and for all. At Active Self Protection we are pro-LEO (never pro-bad-cop), and this is why we say that good cops NEVER shoot for the leg.

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original video of officer involved shooting: https://get-asp.com/9t3c

 

What does this officer involved shooting teach LEO and CCW alike?

 

  1. Our goal as self-defenders is to stop the threat. We are not vigilantes and we are not out to kill, we seek to stop the threat against us. Shooting to wound will not stop the threat reliably, and neither will shooting an attacker in an extremity. The only reliably means to stop an aggressor who means us death or grievous bodily harm is to put shots in the center of their available mass to cause nervous system collapse or bleeding out. (exsanguination is the technical term) This officer involved shooting shows how unreliable it is to shoot an attacker in an extremity, since the armed robber was still standing THIRTEEN SECONDS after being shot in the leg. Shooting in the leg simply will not reliably stop the threat.

 

  1. One of the five pillars of lawful, moral self-defense is “imminence,” (get a nutshell here: http://get-asp.com/wbbp or the whole concept here: http://get-asp.com/1fqe). Imminence means the threat is happening RIGHT NOW, that it’s neither too late nor too early for you to defend yourself! The standard of imminence is seen as a triad of ability, opportunity, and jeopardy (also known as the AOJ triad, which is explained here: http://get-asp.com/pm3k). Clearly, this officer involved shooting had some elements of all three, and the officer was at some point justified to end the threat of the armed robber to everyone around him.

 

  1. In a deadly force encounter, decisions of life and death will be made in the blink of an eye. On the range and in class we have time to consider and to think and to reset and to make multiple attempts, but when the balloon goes up in real life you’ve got fractions of seconds to decide what the best course of action is to protect yourself. The way to be better at decision making in the heat of the moment is training, specifically scenario training and force-on-force training that is designed to work on decision-making skills under stress. It’s offered all over the country, so get training! In this officer involved shooting, there were so many decisions that had to be made in the moment. Training helps make those easier!

 

  1. Spiritual fitness is an important part of Active Self Protection. You don’t often get any advance notice of the last day of your life, but we see over and over that self-defense isn’t a guarantee of winning every fight you might be placed in. You want to be at peace with God, because you’ll need that peace on the day that you meet Him. Since you can’t guarantee advanced notice, make peace today. Clearly this robber wasn’t a boy scout, and we’re not saying that the officer involved shooting wasn’t justified. But even bad guys need to consider their spiritual condition! (and hopefully before their acts, causing them to change their ways)

 

  1. Do not stay in the danger zone if you can possibly help it. So many times people get decision paralysis and freeze, but you cannot stay in a place where a deadly threat exists! Either act to leave the area, or act to protect yourself. Every second you give an attacker is another opportunity they have to do you and yours harm, so don’t allow that. If you can, get out of there immediately. If you can’t, then look for your opportunity to ensure your own safety by whatever means necessary. Before the officer involved shooting there are all kinds of instances where the officer and everyone around stayed in the danger zone. (I would guess this has to be cultural at some significant level)

 

  1. First aid skills are important. If you’re going to train and prepare to take a life to defend yourself, you should also have skills, training, and equipment to save life should you need to. (I carry an individual first aid kit at a minimum) Often that will not involve defensive encounters, and in a defensive encounter your primary responsibility is to yourself and your loved ones. In this officer involved shooting, the bad guy passed out 40 seconds after being shot. Imagine if that was one of your loved ones after a defensive encounter and they were shot. You have 40 seconds to get the blood stopped. Do you have the first aid skills and tools to do it?

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)

Concealed Carrier Murdered Trying to Stop Mass Shooting

If you were there that day, would you have tried to stop this before it became a mass shooting? This is the kind of mass shooting attempt that doesn’t get into the statistics because it doesn’t meet the threshold for killing, but it nevertheless is sad and tragic. Joseph Wilcox should be remembered as a brave man, and we must learn Active Self Protection lessons from his death to redeem his murder.

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original video of the mass shooting with details of the investigation and more: https://get-asp.com/lkvm

 

What can CCW holders learn from this mass shooting attempt?

 

  1. Spiritual fitness is an important part of Active Self Protection. You don’t often get any advance notice of the last day of your life, but we see over and over that self-defense isn’t a guarantee of winning every fight you might be placed in. You want to be at peace with God and your loved ones, because you’ll need that peace on the day that you meet Him. Since you can’t guarantee advanced notice, make peace today! Joseph Wilcox didn’t wake up this morning thinking he was going to try to stop a mass shooting and die, so learn the lesson from his death and be at peace today.

 

  1. Evil exists in our world, and no amount of wishing it away does so. Evil people do evil things, and good people must be ready and willing to stand between them and innocent people and do enough violence to stop them definitively. No amount of negotiation will make truly evil people change their ways; only those willing and able to stop them who use attitude, skills, and plan effectively can. If you go read the link, this mass shooting was stopped by officers with guns who killed the first perp. (the second killed herself) Wilcox was willing to step in with great violence as well.

 

  1. Most attacks are perpetrated by men (source: http://get-asp.com/821s for that) but that doesn’t mean that women are always safe. It does mean that statistically women are much less of a threat than men for violence. However, each person is an individual, and each individual must be considered for their unique threat profile rather than lumped into a category. Just because women are less likely to commit violent crime doesn’t mean that they are unlikely in a given instance to commit violent crime. In this mass shooting, it’s possible that Wilcox ignored the woman simply because he was so focused on the screaming and shooting of the man, but she also presented a lower threat profile as a woman.

 

  1. In a deadly force encounter, decisions of life and death will be made in the blink of an eye. On the range and in class we have time to consider and to think and to reset and to make multiple attempts, but when the balloon goes up in real life you’ve got fractions of seconds to decide what the best course of action is to protect yourself. The way to be better at decision making in the heat of the moment is training, specifically scenario training and force-on-force training that is designed to work on decision-making skills under stress. It’s offered all over the country, so get training! I am not saying that there are a lot of classes on intervening in an attempted mass shooting, but the more training you have the more you will know whether you’d intervene or not. So train!

 

  1. Every person gets to decide who they are willing to protect. For some, their “flock” is only themselves and their immediate family. That’s an acceptable answer. For others, they are willing to protect their friends, coworkers, and extended family. For a few, it might mean being willing to protect anyone who is weak, powerless, and in need. Each of us must decide the size of our flock and have that decision firmly in mind when it is time to act. Kudos to Wilcox for having a flock big enough to try to stop a mass shooting in his area.

 

  1. We must never settle for being able to protect ourselves against a lone attacker because of how common multiple attacker engagements are. Rats travel in packs, so we must always be prepared to face multiple attackers! This mass shooting could have been stopped sooner if the second attacker was seen earlier, though of course I am not blaming him one bit for not seeing her in the chaos of a gunfight. Remember there is always the “unknown opponent,” as Skip Hancock and Lawrence Robinson have taught me over the years.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)

Brutal Sucker Punch of Elderly Woman Caught On Camera

How would you have responded if you were the next guy in line? When I see a sucker punch like this is jut makes me angry. Doubly so when the victim is elderly! We practice Active Self Protection so that these kinds of incidents are minimized, but we also watch these so that we’re ready to respond if they happen near us.

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original video of this sucker punch with details of the incident is here: https://get-asp.com/m8tt

 

What does this sucker punch teach us about covering our ASP?

 

  1. In any territorial or predatorial violence, the attacker gets to set the time and circumstances of the attack. They will almost always launch that attack from ambush, or as we like to call it in Umas, from “obscurity.” Surviving that ambush is one of the most important keys to successfully defending yourself. Clearly it would have been nearly impossible to stop this sucker punch in the moment, but the point is nevertheless valid that we must survive the ambush to be able to defend ourselves.

 

  1. Since criminals are looking for victims and not fights, they tend to look for vulnerable people to target. Think about a pride of lions chasing wildebeest in Africa and you get the picture. They target the elderly, the young, and the sick for easier attack and greater success. Likewise, criminals pick victims who they think will not effectively resist them, or that the criminal can quickly overwhelm. This includes the elderly, the young (kids and early teens), the sick, and the distracted. Men (the overwhelming majority of attackers) also target women because women tend to be physically weaker than men. I can’t tell if this sucker punch was because the victim was elderly, but I highly doubt he would have tried this with a professional bodybuilder.

 

  1. As each of us considers whether to be a Good Samaritan and step into encounters that do not directly involve us, we must consider the implications on our lives and families. Does your desire to step in override your duty to your spouse and children and loved ones? Or is it part of your care for your family to protect others wherever you can? We must also all realize that when we come across an incident in progress that it can be VERY difficult to determine who is the aggressor and who is the defender, who are the good guys and who are the bad guys, and that must give us pause as well. This sucker punch makes it easily clear who is the victim and who is the aggressor, and the sheer evil of the attack means that I for one couldn’t have stayed out of it. You need to decide the issue for you.

 

  1. The Bystander Effect is real. There were at least two people around here, but no one stepped in. You cannot count on anyone breaking the Bystander Effect to help you, especially if the attacker is armed and any help would be at a force deficit from it. Usually the best way to break the Bystander Effect is to have a force multiplication advantage, which is a great reason to keep your force multiplier on you at all times! These people watched the sucker punch happen and then stood there dumbfounded, which is not uncommon. When you see something like this, ACT!

 

  1. First aid skills are important. If you’re going to train and prepare to take a life to defend yourself, you should also have skills, training, and equipment to save life should you need to. (I carry an individual first aid kit at a minimum) Often that will not involve defensive encounters, and in a defensive encounter your primary responsibility is to yourself and your loved ones. You might never come upon a sucker punch like this, but having first aid skills to help the woman and the willingness to do so, as well as some basic equipment, is wise.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)

Suicide by Cop Caught On Camera

Do you think the officer did right here? There is a lot of angst in America right now about police conduct, and it’s appropriate to hold officers to high standards for sure. This suicide by cop that was caught on local surveillance camera shows some significant lessons for citizens and LEO alike about how fast these incidents happen. At Active Self Protection we’re pro-LEO (not pro-bad-cop at all!) and agree with the DA here that this officer acted in good faith to protect himself.

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original video with information on the incident: http://get-asp.com/htrw

 

Second video of the incident with details on the events: http://get-asp.com/oyvp

 

What does this Suicide by Cop teach self-defenders of all kinds?

 

  1. One of the five pillars of lawful, moral self-defense is “imminence,” (get a nutshell here: http://get-asp.com/wbbp or the whole concept here: http://get-asp.com/1fqe). Imminence means the threat is happening RIGHT NOW, that it’s neither too late nor too early for you to defend yourself! The standard of imminence is seen as a triad of ability, opportunity, and jeopardy (also known as the AOJ triad, which is explained here: http://get-asp.com/pm3k). Notice in this suicide by cop that the officer brought deadly force to bear not when the perp was yelling, but when he made the furtive gesture from concealment to do him harm. That’s an important reminder, that imminence is a critical principle of lawful and moral self-defense.

 

  1. In a deadly force encounter, decisions of life and death will be made in the blink of an eye. On the range and in class we have time to consider and to think and to reset and to make multiple attempts, but when the balloon goes up in real life you’ve got fractions of seconds to decide what the best course of action is to protect yourself. The way to be better at decision making in the heat of the moment is training, specifically scenario training and force-on-force training that is designed to work on decision-making skills under stress. It’s offered all over the country, so get training! This suicide by cop happened in a matter of 10 seconds of pre-shooting yelling, and then a second of action. Be ready by training!

 

  1. Even in a gunfight, empty-handed skills are important because many gunfights close to “extreme close quarters” or “bad breath distances.” Knowing how to protect your firearm from being taken, and how to win the fight that you’re actually in rather than the fight you want to be in, is crucial. For LEO, every encounter you have to use your firearm in will end with you going hands-on with a perp to get them in cuffs. Armed citizens might not have to deal with suicide by cop, but we might have to deal with gunfights that close to fistfights.

 

  1. To defend against this kind of attack, you need emotional fitness. Emotional fitness is defined as the ability to internally represent a situation or predicament to yourself in such a way as to make you strong and able to successfully defend yourself against it. Repeated practice and thousands of reps of sparring and self-defense absolutely build your emotional fitness to be able to handle whatever comes your way. In this suicide by cop the officer stayed cool emotionally and reacted appropriately because he had great emotional fitness.

 

  1. The human body is designed to take a ridiculous amount of punishment and still function. You can shoot someone multiple times and they can still pose a deadly threat! Even mortally wounded people can continue to pose a threat for several seconds to even minutes after being shot, so don’t think for a moment that shooting someone will necessarily immediately incapacitate them. That is Hollywood myth. In this suicide by cop we see that even a mortally wounded man can continue to function and fight for a long time.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)

Thugs Murder Off Duty Officer in Front of His Family

These are the sad lessons that we have to bring to you at Active Self Protection, but this murder of an off duty officer teaches us all some important lessons about how targeted violence really happens. How might he have won this fight, do you think?

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original video with some details on the murder here: http://get-asp.com/co2k

 

What does this murder teach us about self-defense?

 

  1. In a deadly force encounter, decisions of life and death will be made in the blink of an eye. On the range and in class we have time to consider and to think and to reset and to make multiple attempts, but when the balloon goes up in real life you’ve got fractions of seconds to decide what the best course of action is to protect yourself. The way to be better at decision making in the heat of the moment is training, specifically scenario training and force-on-force training that is designed to work on decision-making skills under stress. It’s offered all over the country, so get training! This murder was over in seconds; there was no second chance. The only way to get more chances would be to train similar scenarios against a drawn gun again and again and again.

 

  1. In any territorial or predatorial violence, the attacker gets to set the time and circumstances of the attack. They will almost always launch that attack from ambush, or as we like to call it in Umas, from “obscurity.” Surviving that ambush is one of the most important keys to successfully defending yourself. The murder was already underway when the officer sees the murderers, and he unfortunately didn’t survive the ambush.

 

  1. Situational awareness is your best friend. It doesn’t mean that you always are paranoid or living in “condition orange,” but it does mean that you know Col. Cooper’s color code of awareness and you live by it. Pay attention to your surroundings, and recognize that when you’re in public places you need to be more aware of your surroundings than when you’re in private. Another half-second of notice and this murder might have been a successful self-defense encounter.

 

  1. The human body is designed to take a ridiculous amount of punishment and still function. You can shoot someone multiple times and they can still pose a deadly threat! Even mortally wounded people can continue to pose a threat for several seconds to even minutes after being shot, so don’t think for a moment that shooting someone will necessarily immediately incapacitate them. That is Hollywood myth. The reverse is also true, that when you’re shot you’re still in the fight. Even this murder shows us how long someone can continue to fight while mortally wounded.

 

  1. Keep your firearm ready to fire. Some people carry their firearm with an empty chamber, but doing so is not recommended for several reasons. First, it assumes that you will have both hands available to you to draw your firearm, which isn’t necessarily the case. You might have a hand engaged or injured. Secondly, it assumes that you’ll have time to chamber a round in a gunfight, but gunfights are won and lost on tenths of seconds. Third, it assumes that you’ll have the dexterity to chamber a round under duress, though in the moment many times I have seen people fumble their chambering attempt. Keep your defensive firearm ready to fire, with a round in the chamber! A contributing factor to this murder is the fact that this officer didn’t have his firearm in a ready condition.

 

  1. Spiritual fitness is an important part of Active Self Protection. You don’t often get any advance notice of the last day of your life, but we see over and over that self-defense isn’t a guarantee of winning every fight you might be placed in. You want to be at peace with God, because you’ll need that peace on the day that you meet Him. Since you can’t guarantee advanced notice, make peace today.

 

  1. The Five Ds are a tool that we use at ASP to organize our training and preparation for defending ourselves against an armed attacker when we are not armed ourselves. (or if we are armed but outdrawn such that we must deal with the problem with our hands) Deflect, Dominate, Distract, Disarm, Disable. We pursue them from first to last, in order, to give us the best chance of successfully defending ourselves against an armed opponent. Deflect their force multiplier, Dominate as much as possible (best is the whole person, second is the arm with the tool, last is the tool itself), Distract the attacker (usually using pain, redirection, movement, etc.), Disarm the attacker, and Disable the attacker. Had this officer driven IN to the gun and practiced the Five Ds rather than pulling away to draw his own, the murder might not have been completed.

 

  1. First aid skills are important. If you’re going to train and prepare to take a life to defend yourself, you should also have skills, training, and equipment to save life should you need to. Often that will not involve defensive encounters, and in a defensive encounter your primary responsibility is to yourself and your loved ones.

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)

Good Samaritan Tackles Fleeing Shoplifter

I am always grateful to see a Good Samaritan step in to do the right thing, but it’s worth considering our Active Self Protection before stepping in recklessly. Would you have tackled this shoplifter?

This video is sponsored by CCWSafe, who I use to help me win the fight after the fight: https://get-asp.com/ccwsafe. I am a member and I recommend them highly; please go check them out and thank them for being a sponsor of our daily lessons!

 

Original video with some details here (Google Translate from Afrikaans required): http://get-asp.com/qqn4

 

Is it good ASP to be a Good Samaritan? What precautions should we consider?

 

  1. Every person gets to decide who they are willing to protect. For some, their “flock” is only themselves and their immediate family. That’s an acceptable answer! For others, they are willing to protect their friends, coworkers, and extended family. For a few, it might mean being willing to protect anyone who is weak, powerless, and in need. Each of us must decide the size of our flock and have that decision firmly in mind when it is time to act. There is no moral or legal requirement to be a Good Samaritan like this and stop a shoplifter. Each of us must make the decision in advance how large our flock is!

 

  1. As each of us considers whether to be a Good Samaritan and step into encounters that do not directly involve us, we must consider the implications on our lives and families. Does your desire to step in override your duty to your spouse and children and loved ones? Or is it part of your care for your family to protect others wherever you can? We must also all realize that when we come across an incident in progress that it can be VERY difficult to determine who is the aggressor and who is the defender, who are the good guys and who are the bad guys, and that must give us pause as well. This Good Samaritan made the good call in the moment, but note how little time he had to make it!

 

  1. In a deadly force encounter, decisions of life and death will be made in the blink of an eye. On the range and in class we have time to consider and to think and to reset and to make multiple attempts, but when the balloon goes up in real life you’ve got fractions of seconds to decide what the best course of action is to protect yourself. Having a plan in place and knowing in advance in your soul whether you’ll be a Good Samaritan is an important part of being ready in the moment.

 

  1. We must each decide what is worth protecting. Life is always worth protecting because it is of inestimable worth; as unique bearers of the image of God, people are the most valuable “thing” imaginable. Property is something else, though. With property we always have to balance the benefit against the risk to ourselves and our families. Even where it’s legally allowed, you should consider whether it’s wise or prudent to defend your property, because doing so puts you at risk and not just the bad guy. Again, this Good Samaritan did great, and should be praised for stopping a thief. That said, he put himself at significant risk to stop him!

 

Attitude. Skills. Plan.

 

(music in the intro and outro courtesy of http://www.bensound.com)